Glazer Still Mocking ESPN's Favre Coverage

It's been nine months since Jay Glazer and ESPN traded public barbs about Brett Favre and the sweet nothings he whispered into Matt Millen's ear while blowing the innards out of roaming wildlife, and the bad feelings from that episode seem to have died down. In the same way that devilish ghouls possessed by the spirit of Satan die down the first time you hit them in the kidneys with a wiffle ball bat, before they ultimately spring back to life, break down your basement door with their bald soulless skulls and get you in a rear-naked choke hold with the help of a former Heisman Trophy winner while screaming epithets about scoopage. ↵

↵"I think you’ve seen how the Favre thing has gone down already," Glazer told WNYC's On The Media this week, when asked why he reported on Favre's conversations with Millen without asking the QB for a comment. "Every single second of the day ... Favre has told them that he’s walking with his right foot today. Now ESPN is reporting that he walked with his left foot. Now ESPN’s reporting that Brett has laid down. So I knew that If I called Brett, Brett would have called ESPN, and that was as simple as that ... ↵

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↵"Some other people said, 'Well, you should have called Brett.' Yeah, I would have loved to have, but the fact is, we have seen how Brett is, where he and his agent talk constantly with ESPN and NFL Network. I couldn’t trust that had I called, it wouldn’t have been on ESPN, before I ever went on on Fox NFL Sunday. I couldn’t have tipped my opponents’ hand." ↵

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↵(Favre would have turned the information over? It would have been intercepted? Hard to imagine.) ↵

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↵If Favre actually did such a thing, it'd be an ethical lapse on his part, but preempting one ethical lapse doesn't give you permission to break a rule on your own. So Glazer is essentially arguing that his own war against ESPN is more important to him than any sort of stodgy journalistic tenet. Which makes sense, because Glazer, as he would admit, isn't a customary journalist. He's part of the story, quite happily thanks, no matter if you call him a journalist or a stooge. Once that's clear up-front, all the rest of his routine follows. ↵

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↵For example, NPR isn't often the home for muscle-filled braggadocio from sports reporters, but Glazer isn't exactly Steve Inskeep, so if you're wondering when you're finally gonna find out who his source was on the Spygate tapes? ↵

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↵"To this day, nobody has an ounce of a clue of where I have gotten those tapes from," Glazer bragged. "I will go to my grave, and nobody will ever have any idea where I got these tapes from." ↵

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↵So SpyThroat's secret has thus trumped Deep Throat's secret on the grand master secrecy scale. Glazer also said that he has still not told any superiors at Fox who his source was, and that he doesn't have to, because the tapes are their own evidence. That's like a first-day lesson at Glazer's Journalism 101. And he again defended his weird relationships with several NFL players and his MMA training of Matt Leinart, not as journalistically pure but as something that works in the favor of sports fans who want information. ↵

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↵"I’m training him because who wouldn’t love to beat the hell out of a Heisman Trophy winner?" Glazer joked. "What I always tell people is because I have a great relationship with guys, I can break chops, I can criticize, I can get after guys, because I have that relationship. When you don’t have a relationship, that’s when you lose your access to somebody. And that’s the way I look at it." ↵

↵The program's host, Mike Pesca, closed the segment by asking Glazer about his commercial work for Subway, and the fact that this was, yet again, not something that a regular old reporting reporter would do. Which prompted Glazer to accurately describe his role as something beyond that of objective scribbler. ↵

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↵While I still say journos shouldn't be cashing sponsor checks, he was being both truthful and appealingly honest; instead of hiding behind the rhetoric about delivering the news, Glazer admitted that he IS part of the story, and always will be. If ESPN's Team Favre gang would make the same admission, their saturation coverage would become a little easier to stomach. ↵

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↵"I think I’ve positioned myself where I’m not just a reporter, I’m a character," Glazer said, and then demonstrated the point with a story about hanging out with Jared from Subway in Vegas. ↵

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↵"I told Jared from Subway to go play craps," Glazer recalled. "And when he showed up, I was like, 'Dude, we’re playing craps.' And he said, 'Well I don’t play craps.' I said, 'I don’t care. I said, 'You are the luckiest S.O.B. who has ever lived. I don’t know what the hell you did in a previous life, but God has blessed you, because basically you were a fat dude who ate Subway, and now you’re skinny, get women and money. So whatever that is, that luck is rubbing off on me.' ↵

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↵"And he could do no wrong, I’ve got to tell you, we rolled for about 45 minutes. It was great." ↵

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↵My only complaint is that no one has reported on what Jared from Subway and Jay Glazer did after they left the craps table. That's some real scoopage, there. ↵

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This post originally appeared on the Sporting Blog. For more, see The Sporting Blog Archives.

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