Press Coverage: Super Bowl Edition

↵Phil SimmsIn Press Coverage, we often try to find the stories that aren't talked about during the week, or small things in a telecast that viewers may have missed. Good luck with that for the Super Bowl, when more than 100 million people are watching. ↵

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↵There are some things, however, worth mentioning. First, CBS did a great job with the actual televising of the game. The angles were right at the right times, the slow motion replays were, in a word, super. When New Orleans challenged a two-point conversion, the ruling was made easier because of the technology employed at the game. From CBS' release about their high-speed cameras: ↵

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↵⇥⇥THE SUPER BOWL ON CBS will feature six high-speed cameras, known as SuperVision, that will be in hard and hand-held configurations located on the field, in the stands and on sideline carts. Each camera will have the ability to shoot 300-500 frames per second (normal cameras shoot 60 fps) in 1080i high definition format. These Vision Research Phantom V-640 cameras are supplied by Inertia Unlimited and are particularly used in determining questionable calls on the field (ie. fumbles, receptions, out-of-bounds, etc.) from all different angles. ↵
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↵Perfect use of technology by CBS — clearly not just adding technology for tech's sake. ↵

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↵Second, Jim Nantz and Phil Simms (pictured) did an adept job calling the game. They weren't great, but didn't do anything to really ruin the broadcast either. Simms did initially miss the fact that Hank Baskett had touched the ball on the onside kick, spending time questioning if the ball had gone far enough for the Saints to recover. ↵

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↵He was also rather confusing during the replay of the two-point conversion, focusing a lot of the time on a second football maneuver, or a second act as I believe he put it, when really the ball only had to be possessed across the goal line ... which it clearly was. ↵

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↵Simms also pointed out during an early replay when Dwight Freeney needed two men to block him that "clearly" the ankle was bothering him. Freeney was, at that time in the game, the dominant player to that point. At the start of the second half, it took far too long for the booth to realize that the reason Freeney wasn't out on the field because he expected the offense to have the ball, an oversight that was saved by a report from Steve Tasker talking about how Freeney needed his ankle to be re-taped. ↵

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↵Which Story line Was More Overblown?
↵As we've mentioned, the Focus on the Family ad was just so brilliant in what it didn't say, rather than anything the ad actually did say. It was two weeks of a firestorm that added publicity for the organization. But was that more or less overblown than Dwight Freeney's ankle? Freeney was absolutely dominant early in the game, and while he seemed a bit hobbled in the second half, there was no doubt he made the right decision to play. ↵

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↵Warren Sapp took an adamant stance that Freeney wouldn't be playing, solely on the fact he didn't have the ankle wrapped or iced during media day. It was ridiculous at the time, and even more ridiculous now. Sapp was just talking to talk, yammering without any sense of accountability. Of course, Sapp had a bigger mea culpa to deal with on Sunday. ↵

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↵The CBS Alphadog
↵Jim Nantz is clearly the CBS alpha dog. With James Brown, Dan Marino and a host of other CBS power names in the building, it was Nantz who presented the Lombardi Trophy to the Saints. Nantz was also the only media person — unless you count Charles Barkley — to be featured in a Super Bowl ad. He is, in a word, ubiquitous. ↵

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↵Suits!
↵I understand that men in suits are more trusted than men in, say, pajama pants (note: I'm wearing jeans while I write this), but is there ever a time when wearing a suit it too formal for a football telecast? Say, for example, the set ESPN used that was on the beach? Isn't that a time for a nice golf shirt or one of those Ditka Tommy Bahama loungewear tops? When I think of a suit on the beach, it's of the swim variety, not the double-breasted. Wait. ↵

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↵Also, CBS not only had a shirt-and-tie segment on the makeshift field, they also did a tailgating segment with Food Network's Guy Fieri where they cooked in suits. Come on, guys, how about a wardrobe change? If they can do it at the Grammy Awards, they can do it at the Super Bowl. ↵

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This post originally appeared on the Sporting Blog. For more, see The Sporting Blog Archives.

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