The Dolphins' Side of Dez Bryant's Talk With Jeff Ireland Comes Out; Source Issues Denial

↵ESPN analyst Marcellus Wiley was taking over Twitter this morning with accusations that there's more to this whole Dez Bryant story than people have been reporting. ↵

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↵⇥I'm not the only person that knows the entire story, but every1 is trying to protect Dez. That's why it's not out YET! ↵
↵Wiley went on for a while, talking about how, "you must learn who you tell stories to in this league. Mike Silver is for Vets and the Media Savvy, Dez should've been warned," before going so far as to say that Dolphins GM Jeff Ireland is part of this cabal of insiders who are protecting Bryant by not publicly introducing the rest of the story. So what is the rest of the story? From Wiley's Twitter feed: ↵
↵⇥BINGO! RT @RealCedAllen Takin a guess but never heard ANYTHING bout Dez's pops! Is it that he was once a pimp? That would give reason 2 ask. ↵
↵And now the real story of how the conversation went between Ireland and Bryant, courtesy of Dan LeBatard's show feed: ↵
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↵UPDATE: Mike Silver of Yahoo, who originally broke this story wide open, just tweeted the following: ↵
↵⇥I just got off the phone with a source very close to Dez Bryant, and we had a long talk about context...


This is what the source close to Bryant said about the things the Dolphins are putting three days after the fact, without names attached: ↵⇥

↵⇥"That's bullsh--. It didn't go down like (the Dolphins are implying it did). There's nothing to say. If a guy calls and apologizes, what else is there to add on? Enough said. (The apology) confirmed (Dez's version). The apology was accepted, and now it's time to move on."  ↵⇥

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↵UPDATE #2: Silver received a text from Bryant himself: Just got a text from Dez Bryant. "I did not say that... this guy is lying." By "this guy" he means "unnamed Dolphins sources...
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↵Also, from Ed Werder on ESPN: "In response to a question on this topic from me yesterday inquring about whether Jeff Ireland did ask him if his mother was a prostitute based on his disclosure to Ireland that his father was a pimp, Bryant told me, 'No I didn't tell him that my father was a pimp.'  So he has so far denied that."
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↵We verified through our contacts that the version that leaked out earlier in the day by Wiley and LeBatard on Twitter - and confirmed by a report on SI.com -  is how the story went down, at least from the Dolphins standpoint. Ireland asked what Bryant's dad did and Bryant told him he was a pimp. He asked what his mom did and Bryant said she worked for his dad, leading Ireland to ask if she was a hooker. That's the only part question we originally got from Silver's original Yahoo story, so now that the rest of the exchange has come out – depending on who you believe – the anger toward Ireland may be a bit misplaced, no? ↵

↵It's actually quite amazing to me how much fervor this has created, making me feel like a bit of a sociopath for thinking the question was tactless, but fair to ask a guy you're potentially going to give millions of dollars to. In addition, hearing the team's explanation, it was clearly germane for Ireland to ask that question in that context. By all accounts, the question may have been disrespectful, but it seems that Bryant opened the door. ↵

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↵And while we're on it, I just don't see how sending private investigators to research a prospect's background – something the league and teams regularly do – is okay, but asking a kid a question like this about his mom is off limits. Michael Vick was adamant about the fact that he didn't think dog fighting was all that bad because he was raised in an environment where the practice was commonplace. So shouldn't teams be doing their research as to what type of criminality a prospect is exposed? My wife, a PhD in criminal justice, went back and forth with me on this: ↵

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↵⇥"Social Disorganization Theory says any exposure to that sort of criminal life can make you more likely to do it. Social Bond Theory says that, in essence, subjects form bonds with people and – to put it a way sports fans can understand – being around people who do bad things does make someone more likely to do bad things themselves. ↵⇥
↵⇥
↵⇥"Having said that, there are many criminological theories that suggest that free will is more important than socialization." ↵
↵In other words, people should be able to decide right from wrong on their own, but there are theories that indicate being exposed to a life full of bad decisions could lead to bad decisions. With millions of dollars at stake, it's amazing if more people didn't ask the questions Ireland did…albeit with a little more tact.↵

This post originally appeared on the Sporting Blog. For more, see The Sporting Blog Archives.

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