Kyle Lohse Recovering From Surgery To Repair Rare Condition In Forearm

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Lohse Begins His Rehab From Forearm Surgery

Kyle Lohse had surgery last Friday to fix a rare condition in his right forearm. This isn't news. What is news? We might have a timetable, here.

“The doctor said six to eight weeks. Who knows, because no one’s ever had it.  I’ve heard other people talking about 12 (weeks), but I think that’s a bit much considering they didn’t do anything with the muscle."
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Lohse, who is in the second year of a 4-year, $41 million contract, will start physical therapy later this week and hopes to return in six to eight weeks. But that remains to be seen, all thanks to one hit-by-pitch.

It's important to state, again, that because this is unprecedented in baseball circles, no one's quite sure how long it'll be before Lohse can come back. However, the doctors are saying ~2 months, and no one's better equipped to come up with a good estimate.

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Sure Enough, Lohse Will Undergo Surgery For Forearm Condition

Earlier Thursday morning, it was reported that Kyle Lohse would either need an operation to repair a rare forearm condition, or he'd need to change roles to short reliever to keep symptoms to a minimum. Well, surgery it is.

Lohse to have forearm surgery in LA tomorrow. Could be less than 2 months out of action, or it could be much longer

Because this is an unprecedented baseball injury, there's no telling just how long Lohse will be out, but the Cardinals would be wise to not plan on having him for the rest of the year. More important is getting Lohse back and healthy for 2011.

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Kyle Lohse Has Rare Condition, Faces Prospect Of Surgery

Kyle Lohse has been dealing with forearm issues for the better part of a calendar year. Most recently he felt some pain in a start against the Angels, and when an MRI revealed inflammation, Lohse visited a specialist, who determined that Lohse is suffering from a rare condition in his right arm:

Cardinals starting pitcher Kyle Lohse is suffering from a rare condition that either requires surgery or necessitates a permanent role change, say sources familiar with the diagnosis given Lohse on Wednesday by an Anaheim, Calif., specialist.
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[The specialist] found Lohse to be suffering from exertional compartment syndrome, a condition in which the sheath covering a muscle in the pitcher's forearm fails to allow it to expand.

It's as unprecedented a baseball injury as they come - this syndrome is more commonly associated with distance runners and motocross riders. And, short of surgery, there is no cure. If Lohse opts to go under the knife, he could miss anywhere between two months and the rest of the season. His other option is to become a short reliever, but given that this is a condition that intensified with effort, the problem would likely follow him to the bullpen as well.

Lohse says he's been pitching through discomfort since spring training, which might explain why his numbers have taken a turn for the worse. He remains under contract with St. Louis through 2012, with each of the next two seasons worth $11.875m.

It's not yet known how the Cardinals will attempt to fill the void in their rotation. Read more at Viva El Bidos.

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