CINCINNATI - MAY 18: Prince Fielder #28 of the Milwaukee Brewers is pictured after striking out during the game against the Cincinnati Reds at Great American Ball Park on May 18, 2010 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

MLB Trade Deadline: Breaking Down The Best Players Available At Each Position

Stay locked in to this StoryStream as we review the players who are or may become available as upgrades as the MLB trade deadline approaches, broken down by position. All for your convenience.

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MLB Trade Rumors, By Position: Corey Hart One Of Many Outfielders Being Looked At By Giants, Others

That was an ugly trip through much of the infield, but thankfully we've gotten ourselves to the conclusion of this series: the outfield, where one can find a number of useful players who might get themselves traded to a contender. Even without David DeJesus being on the market anymore due to his injury, there are still pieces here for a team to upgrade a decent player, or even upgrade a good one.

OUTFIELD

Rick Ankiel, 31, Left

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

83

0.237

0.289

0.474

2010: $3.25m
2011: $6m mutual option

Ankiel just recently returned from a minor league rehab stint following some leg problems, but while his numbers aren't great, he has a ton of power and can punish right-handed pitchers. If he shows enough over the next few days, he could find himself a role player on a good team. He can play center field, albeit not very well.

Jose Bautista, 29, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

411

0.242

0.355

0.548

2010: $2.4m
2011: arbitration-eligible

Bautista's stock has skyrocketed in 2010, as he's come out of nowhere to assume the league lead in home runs. As such, there's an awful lot of interest in his services, although the fact that he'll be fairly cheap again in 2011 has led the Blue Jays to attach a high price tag. Odds are Bautista doesn't get moved, but if he does, he's an instant improvement for any order.

Jeff Francouer, 26, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

344

0.248

0.299

0.379

2010: $5m
2011: arbitration-eligible

Francouer wouldn't be an upgrade for anybody, but he's still available and seems to have this weird pull over Major League front offices. I wouldn't want my team to trade for him. I wouldn't wish him on my enemies.

Kosuke Fukudome, 33, Left

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

273

0.253

0.356

0.410

2010: $13m
2011: $13.5m

Fukudome comes with an enormous price tag, but the Cubs have voiced a willingness to cover some of that to see him moved, which should help the process. He's still not a good bet to get traded; the walks and versatility are nice, but the cost is insane.

Jose Guillen, 34, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

398

0.273

0.334

0.460

2010: $12m

With DeJesus down, Guillen emerges as the Royals outfielder most likely to get traded. One problem is that he isn't a great defensive outfielder. Another problem is that, after a torrid April, he's only hit eight home runs since May 5th. Even so, he's an appealing, "proven RBI" bat who could find a new temporary home.

Corey Hart, 28, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

370

0.292

0.349

0.568

2010: $4.8m
2011: arbitration-eligible

One of the premier bats on the market, Hart recently suffered a minor wrist injury, but he's beat the snot out of the ball all season with the Brewers and finds himself at the center of rumors these days. Even with a lot of money coming in 2011, the low cost in 2010 only increases his appeal.

Austin Kearns, 30, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

329

0.266

0.349

0.408

2010: $0.75m

A good bounceback year for Kearns has seen him become something of an ideal fourth outfielder, as he draws walks, hits for some power, and can cover all three positions. He's exactly the kind of outfielder a good team wants on the bench in the playoffs.

Ryan Langerhans, 30, Left

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

71

0.208

0.408

0.340

2010: $0.525m
2011: arbitration-eligible

Kind of like Kearns in a lot of ways, Langerhans is an ideal backup outfielder who draws a ton of walks and plays excellent defense everywhere. He's long been worthy of more playing time than he's received, and he could be of great use to a contending team, if anyone notices.

Corey Patterson, 30, Left

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

243

0.277

0.329

0.409

2010: ? (low)

Patterson's been a rare useful player for the Orioles, and he may have been useful enough to earn the chance to be a useful player somewhere else, as he can run around in center and pop the occasional home run.

Scott Podsednik, 34, Left

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

421

0.309

0.353

0.399

2010: $1.65m
2011: $2m club option

Podsednik's been the same guy for two years, and he's just another ideal fourth outfielder. He puts the bat on the ball, he can play anywhere, and he runs until there's nowhere to run anymore. He's an overrated player, but a helpful one, and he comes with the highly-valued postseason experience.

Cody Ross, 29, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

394

0.273

0.330

0.402

2010: $4.45m
2011: arbitration-eligible

The power that once made Ross a really interesting player has dropped off, but the memory is there, and he can cover all three positions, making him interesting off the bench. For his career, while he's struggled against righties, he has just annihilated southpaw opponents.

Jayson Werth, 31, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

396

0.286

0.379

0.506

2010: $7m

Werth is only getting moved if the Phillies land a big-money starter, but if he does become available, he's a prize. Much has been made of his recent slump, but his 2010 numbers look just like his 2009 numbers, and he's a good defensive corner outfielder who can play center in a pinch without embarrassing himself. Werth's a legitimately great player.

Josh Willingham, 31, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

384

0.273

0.401

0.479

2010: $4.6m
2011: arbitration-eligible

Willingham is no one's idea of a gifted outfielder, but he isn't a nightmare out there, and he has a career OBP of .368 with above-average power. It seems like he's always on the market, and there's a reason for that - he's a valuable player with a reasonable salary. There's no questioning the demand. There's only questioning whether the Nationals would trade Willingham for a price that anyone would agree to.

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MLB Trade Rumors, By Position: Yankees, Rockies Among Teams Eyeing Third Basemen, Like Jhonny Peralta

This market may not be spectacular, but at least it's better than the shortstops.

THIRD BASE

Wes Helms, 34, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

137

0.248

0.314

0.400

2010: $0.95m

Helms obviously isn't starter material, and hasn't been in years, but he has hit .274 for his career as a pinch-hitter, making him one of the more accomplished reserve bats around. If and when the Marlins decide to sell, Helms could easily see himself moved to another contender's bench.

Jose Lopez, 26, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

414

0.236

0.268

0.335

2010: $2.3m
2011: $4.5m club option

Lopez has followed up a promising 2009 with an absolutely dreadful 2010, and though he's taken well to a new position at third, he's been one of the worst hitters in baseball. If he gets moved, it's probably to fill in off the bench with an eye towards turning him around in 2011.

Mike Lowell, 36, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

91

0.213

0.308

0.350

2010: $12m

Lowell has no place on the Red Sox and thus could end up a rare acquisition by a contending team from a contending team. Righty 1B/3B types don't fetch much, but they do have their uses, so Lowell could end up on another bench.

Jhonny Peralta, 28, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

365

0.248

0.310

0.391

2010: $4.6m
2011: $7m club option

Peralta's best days are behind him, but as a righty infielder who can play both third and shortstop, he's an attractive piece for a contending team's bench. What Jorge Cantu has at the plate, Peralta has in the field.

Miguel Tejada, 36, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

415

0.272

0.311

0.368

2010: $6m (plus $0.15m if traded)

Tejada's numbers are down, but moving out of Houston will do that to a hitter. He's no longer starting material, and exists as just another righty corner infielder option on what's a bit of a flooded market. Working in his favor is that Tejada has an impressive track record, which front offices just love.

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MLB Trade Rumors, By Position: Jack Wilson Heads An Awful Group Of Shortstops

As usual, a number of teams like the idea of upgrading at shortstop, and as usual, there's nothing available. This is just...well this is depressing is what this is.

SHORTSTOP

Geoff Blum, 37, Switch

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

151

0.241

0.311

0.307

2010: $1.5m
2011: $1.65m mutual option

Blum is mostly a third baseman, but he's started the plurality of his games this year at short, and realistically, he's just a utility reserve. He's bad, but he's developed a reputation as a clutch bat who's good in the clubhouse, so he may end up at the end of some contender's bench once he shows he's recovered from elbow surgery.

Craig Counsell, 39, Left

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

162

0.236

0.306

0.306

2010: $2.1m

Like Blum, Counsell is more versatile than he is good, but he does have fairly significant postseason experience, so he and his disciplined batter's eye could get moved as the Brewers no longer have any use for him.

Cesar Izturis, 30, Switch

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

310

0.248

0.294

0.290

2010: $2.6m

Gloveman, bad, bench material.

Jack Wilson, 32, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

171

0.255

0.283

0.318

2010: $5m
2011: $5m

Wilson's the only guy here who could actually start, although as good as his defense is, it's hard to see how he'd be an upgrade anywhere. The Mariners will be looking to shed his salary more than anyone will be looking to take it on. I have no idea how this guy hit 12 home runs in 2007.

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MLB Trade Rumors, By Position: At Second Base, Ty Wigginton Is Player Most Likely To Move

There's a lot going on at first base. There's not so much going on around the rest of the infield. Here we take a look at some slim pickings at second:

SECOND BASE

Julio Lugo, 34, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

205

0.258

0.310

0.296

2010: minimum
2011: $9m vesting option

Lugo is an upgrade for no one and strictly bench material at this point, although just what he could provide is up in the air. He did have some success a year ago, but he's not much of a target.

Dan Uggla, 30, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

413

0.274

0.358

0.474

2010: $7.8m
2011: arbitration-eligible

Uggla could be acquired, but the Marlins appear reluctant to move him and have reportedly instead shifted focus to trying to extend him. Though more old than young, even an available Uggla would take a box full of pirate treasure to get.

Rickie Weeks, 27, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

474

0.274

0.376

0.481

2010: $2.75m
2011: arbitration-eligible

The Brewers are in no hurry to move Weeks and haven't declared him available, but he isn't untouchable, and could theoretically end up part of a big package as he's younger, cheaper, and more athletic than Uggla. Even so, the overwhelming odds are that he stays put.

Ty Wigginton, 32, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

385

0.249

0.326

0.443

2010: $3.5m

Wigginton has played first, second, and third this year, and while he isn't actually athletic or a particularly valuable defensive asset, he is still somewhat versatile, and he is still somewhat powerful, so - given his low salary - he's attracted quite a bit of attention, and appears very likely to move. He'd work a lot better off the bench than he would as a starter.  

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MLB Trade Rumors, By Position: Adam Dunn, Prince Fielder Just Part Of A First Base Bumper Crop

And now we move on from backstops to a much fuller position. As impact bats are concerned, first place seems like the place to look.

FIRST BASE

Lance Berkman, 34, Switch

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

344

0.236

0.360

0.420

2010: $14.5m
2011: $15m club option

Berkman has a hefty price tag, and isn't a good bet to be moved. However, the trade picture can change in a hurry, and though Berkman is currently slogging through the worst season of his career, he did post a .907 OPS just a year ago, and a .986 OPS the year before that. He still has to be considered a potential difference-maker; it's just unclear how willing anyone would be to take on his cost.

Russell Branyan, 34, Left

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

240

0.260

0.331

0.498

2010: $1.5m
2011: $5m mutual option

The Mariners traded for Branyan when they were already out of the race, so he may not be on the market, but the team has since landed Justin Smoak and Branyan doesn't appear to be a part of the future, so he could be there as a potential deadline bargain should a team balk at the price tags on Prince Fielder and Adam Dunn. Branyan provides all the power, but less of the reliability.

Jorge Cantu, 28, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

398

0.260

0.309

0.412

2010: $6m

Cantu's in the midst of a down season, but as a versatile right-handed infielder with power, he's managed to draw a fair bit of interest as half of a platoon, having been most strongly linked to the Rangers.

Adam Dunn, 30, Left

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

406

0.281

0.369

0.565

2010: $12m

Dunn is certainly on the market, as the Nationals have had problems trying to negotiate a contract extension. The issue is that the team has reportedly set an extraordinary price. There's no doubting what Dunn would bring to the table for a contender. There's only doubting whether anyone will pay what Washington wants, or whether Washington will back off its demands.

Prince Fielder, 26, Left

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

444

0.262

0.399

0.506

2010: $10.5m
2011: arbitration-eligible

Fielder is like a younger Dunn, and just one of the powerful young bats the Brewers have on the market. Like Dunn, he's very good, and like Dunn, he'd cost a lot - both in terms of prospects now, and money in 2011. It's worth noting that Fielder has lost nearly 100 points off his slugging percentage from a year ago.

Casey Kotchman, 27, Left

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

266

0.225

0.305

0.369

2010: $3.5175m
2011: arbitration-eligible

Kotchman is no one's idea of an impact addition at the deadline, but he's lost his place in Seattle and should soon find himself readily available to be someone's Doug Mientkiewicz. The lefty makes consistent contact and plays excellent defense, making him an attractive bench piece.

Adam LaRoche, 30, Left

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

372

0.255

0.331

0.450

2010: $4.5m
2011: $7.5m mutual option ($9.5m if traded)

The Diamondbacks would like to shed LaRoche, and he'd work as a B-level addition. However, he doesn't really seem to be anyone's first choice, which makes sense, given his limited skillset. 2010 has been the worst season of his career.

Derrek Lee, 34, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

417

0.251

0.338

0.391

2010: $13m

The free agent-to-be has taken a huge step down from his monster 2009, and given his performance, his salary, and concerns over whether he'd waive his no-trade clause, Lee probably isn't going anywhere.

Lyle Overbay, 33, Left

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

392

0.251

0.327

0.416

2010:$7m

Like LaRoche, Overbay is an average first baseman due to be a free agent who has little demand for his services. Toronto would love to dump him, but it's an open question as to whether they'll find a partner, as Overbay just doesn't represent an upgrade for many teams.

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MLB Trade Rumors, By Position: Thin Group Of Catchers Led By John Buck; Tigers Could Have A Need

With pitchers out of the way, we turn our focus to the position players, beginning with catcher. This is one dry market, although there will, as always, be some phone calls. A trade is always possible, as no team is perfectly satisfied with its catching situation.

CATCHERS

Josh Bard, 32, Switch

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

64

0.179

0.266

0.339

2010: ? (low)

Bard is a switch-hitting backstop with fairly good power, so he's appealing as a backup and available for little more than cash or a PTBNL as the Mariners prepare to promote the young Adam Moore. Though his numbers are low, his swing is intact.

John Buck, 30, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

282

0.283

0.312

0.517

2010: $2m

Buck hasn't attracted a ton of attention, but it's worth noting that he's slugged .503 as a catcher since the beginning of 2009. Not known for his defense, his asset is his impressive raw power, which could be of good use to a team as either a starter or a reserve.  

Chris Iannetta, 27, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

119

0.216

0.328

0.461

2010: $1.75m
2011: $2.55m
2012: $3.55m
2013: $5m club option

The Rockies aren't in a hurry to move Iannetta, but he's known to have drawn some interest, as he's an offensive backstop with power and knowledge of the strike zone. He might be a better candidate to be moved in the offseason than during the next week, or the next month.

Chris Snyder, 29, Right

PA

BA

OBP

SLG

195

0.231

0.352

0.426

2010: $4.75m
2011: $5.75m
2012: $6.75m club option

The Diamondbacks are probably more interested in shedding Snyder's salary than any other team is in adding it, but he is a catcher who's shown some discipline and pop, so he isn't untradeable. Despite spending half his time in hitter-friendly Arizona, he's actually hit better on the road than at home for his career, which answers one big question about his offense.

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MLB Trade Rumors, By Position: Red Sox Pursuing Bullpen Help As Scott Downs Fronts Reliever Market

Done with the starters, let's move on to the relievers. Teams are always looking for pitching at the deadline, and said pitching doesn't have to be able to throw seven innings every turn. Oftentimes, a contender will be looking for an extra bullpen piece to help put them over the top. This year, there would appear to be quite a crop of potentially valuable relief options, and though we can't hit on every single guy available, here are the bigger ones:

RELIEF PITCHERS

David Aardsma, 28, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

32.1

4.73

15

35

2010: $2.75m
2011: arbitration-eligible
2012: arbitration-eligible

Seattle's surprising 2009 closer has seen a good bit of regression in 2010, but once you earn the ‘proven' label, it's hard to give it back, and Aardsma comes with a high fastball that's difficult to catch up to. Though a contending team probably won't want him closing, he could be of use as a setup guy.

Matt Capps, 26, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

44

2.86

9

36

2010: $3.5m
2011: arbitration-eligible

Capps has had a very strong year as the Nationals' closer after getting dropped by the Pirates, and though the Nats haven't publicly said he's available, they're reportedly taking a lot of calls, so one strong offer is all it would take to pry him away. Few relievers are able to combine Capps' stuff with his ability to throw strikes.

D.J. Carrasco, 33, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

54.2

3.95

22

44

2010: $0.95m
2011: arbitration-eligible
2012: arbitration-eligible

As a cheap arm who's demonstrated the ability to pitch to both lefties and righties, Carrasco's drawing a fair bit of interest as a 7th-inning option. His name has come up as many of the higher-level relievers have corresponding higher-level prices.

Bruce Chen, 33, LHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

63.2

4.38

30

53

2010: ? (presumably low)

Chen is flexible, having started ten games and made ten appearances out of the bullpen, but he's more likely to end up in relief in the event of a trade. He doesn't do any one thing particularly well and he's always struggled against left-handed hitters, but he'd make sense as someone's backup southpaw.

Octavio Dotel, 36, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

38

4.50

17

47

2010: $3.25m
2011: $4.5m club option (mutual option if traded)

Dotel has put an ugly start behind him, posting a 2.51 ERA since the beginning of May with a bunch of strikeouts and only two home runs. Any reliever with his kind of ability to miss bats will always draw eyes around deadline time.

Scott Downs, 34, LHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

41

2.41

10

33

2010: $4m

No reliever, it seems, has drawn as much interest as Toronto's Downs, who has very quietly posted a 2.29 ERA since 2007. As a strike-throwing groundballer who can handle righties and late innings, there's a reason Toronto reportedly wants a top prospect in return, although they're probably not going to get one.

Kyle Farnsworth, 34, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

41.2

2.38

11

33

2010: $4.5m
2011: $5.25m club option (voidable if traded)

Still with the big arm, now with better results. Given Farnsworth's reputation, few teams will likely trust him in a critical role, but he's there and readily available to pick up some seventh innings down the stretch.

Jason Frasor, 32, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

38.2

4.66

19

41

2010: $2.65m

Frasor has had an up and down year and failed to hold a tentative grasp on the closer role in Toronto, but again, a power arm with strikeouts and groundballs will command some interest, and he could be a more valuable piece than his ERA would suggest.

Kevin Gregg, 32, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

38.2

3.72

22

40

2010: $2m
2011: $4.5m club option OR $8.75m 2011-2012 option

Toronto's new closer hasn't necessarily pitched a lot better than Frasor, but he has a better ERA, and Gregg now has four consecutive years of pitching the ninth. If the Jays back off their high demands, Gregg - like the other two subjects of rumors in the same bullpen - should find a new home on a contending team.

Joel Hanrahan, 28, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

42.2

3.59

14

59

2010: $0.453m
2011: arbitration-eligible
2012: arbitration-eligible
2013: arbitration-eligible

A great get from the Nationals, Hanrahan has taken his game to a new level, and he's still under team control through 2013. Not surprisingly, a lot of teams are interested, and not surprisingly, the Pirates have put a high price tag on his name. Hanrahan won't move unless someone blows Pittsburgh out of the water.

Aaron Heilman, 31, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

45

3.60

21

36

2010: $2.15m

Heilman has drawn some attention for being one of the few Diamondbacks pitchers to not develop a crippling home run problem. As a hard-throwing arm with late-inning experience, Heilman would be a worse but cheaper add than many of the other relievers on the market.

Mark Hendrickson, 36, LHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

54.2

5.60

12

41

2010: $1.2m
2011: $1.2m club option

Hendrickson's ERA is ugly and there aren't a lot of rumors about him out there, but he's a left-handed long reliever who can pitch to both kinds of hitters, which gives him some appeal as a middle-innings pickup. He even comes with the flexibility of maybe starting a few games down the stretch.

Clay Hensley, 30, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

44.1

3.05

18

51

2010: $0.425m
2011: arbitration-eligible
2012: arbitration-eligible
2013: arbitration-eligible

All the failed Padre has done is strike out more than ten batters per nine innings, so, like Hanrahan, he's a good pitcher who's under cheap control for a long time. Unlike Hanrahan, Hensley has worse stuff, so his price would be lower. Still, he won't come at a discount.

Brandon League, 27, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

51.1

3.51

17

39

2010: $1.0875m
2011: arbitration-eligible
2012: arbitration-eligible

League's ERA has gone down, but so has his strikeout rate. Still, with the Mariners in the tank and League offering a mid-90s sinker that generates groundballs like nobody's business, expect the M's to field some offers over the coming days. There are few pitchers out there with arms like League's, so even when the results aren't terrific, the promise is blinding.

Brandon Lyon, 30, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

43.2

3.71

21

33

2010: $4.25m
2011: $5.25m
2012: $5.5m

It didn't take long for the Astros to think twice about their offseason signing, but though Lyon is available and not completely bad, no one's going to take him unless the Astros pick up some of the check or accept a bad deal in return. If Lyon does get moved, it's worth noting that 18 of his 52 walks over the past year and a half have been intentional.

Evan Meek, 27, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

55.1

1.30

14

49

2010: $0.4135m
2011: arbitration-eligible
2012: arbitration-eligible
2013: arbitration-eligible
2014: arbitration-eligible

The Pirates have little incentive to move their young, hard-throwing, All-Star reliever, but they will field calls, and there's no sense in ignoring interested parties on the off chance that someone offers a monumental package. More likely, Meek ends up Pittsburgh's closer of the future.

Will Ohman, 32, LHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

28.2

2.51

17

28

2010: $1.35m

It seems every contending team always wants a lefty specialist for the stretch run, and Ohman is the premier specialist available, as he's held left-handed bats to a .556 OPS on the year and .637 for his career. A concern is that he's struggled to throw consistent strikes, but he's a good bet to get moved at a low cost.

Chad Qualls, 31, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

35

8.49

15

32

2010: $4.185m

A controversial reliever, Qualls has a miserable ERA but a good rate of strikeouts. The Diamondbacks would like to move him, but other teams await some level of consistency. Just last year, Qualls managed 45 strikeouts with just five unintentional walks.

Kerry Wood, 33, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

20

6.30

11

18

2010: $10.5m
2011: $11m club option

The Indians would love to shed Wood's salary, and the righty still throws in the mid- to upper-90s. However, he's been more hittable than in years past, so while he could and should get some feelers and might even find a destination, odds are he won't bring back much for Cleveland, and he probably also won't be counted on to fill a critical role.  

Michael Wuertz, 31, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

22

4.50

10

18

2010: $2.2m
2011: $2.8m
2012: $3.25m club option

Wuertz, who had a monster 2009, is working his way back from shoulder problems. His velocity is coming back, his slider looks as good as ever, and he's whiffed nine hitters in his last 9.1 innings, so the promise is there, but he's a high-risk, high-reward kind of arm. When he's right, he's a difference-maker in the playoffs. When he's wrong, he's not pitching.

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MLB Trade Rumors, By Position: Roy Oswalt, Ted Lilly Top List As Yankees, Cardinals, Others Look Around

The 2010 trading season has already seen a flurry of major activity, as Cliff Lee has gone from Seattle to Texas, Bengie Molina has gone from San Francisco to Texas, Dan Haren has gone from Arizona to Anaheim, and Alberto Callaspo has gone from Kansas City to Anaheim.

Still, while some of the bigger names have already been moved, a number of candidates to be traded remain, and in this StoryStream we will present to you as thorough a list of them as we can manage, broken down by position, complete with relevant contract and performance details. Of these names, expect to see many appear in our MLB trade rumors streams before the week is through. Because if there's one thing the world loves, the world loves rumors.

We'll begin our review by looking at starting pitchers. Seeing Lee and Haren get dealt obviously takes two of the big stars out of the pool, but options remain for teams looking to bring in another arm. Note that all contract information is via Cot's Baseball Contracts.

STARTING PITCHERS

Brian Bannister, 29, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

113

5.73

42

67

2010: $2.3m
2011: arbitration-eligible
2012: arbitration-eligible

The issues with moving Bannister are twofold - one, he'll be fairly cheap for another few seasons, making the Royals reluctant to move him, and two, he isn't very good, making other teams unlikely to want him very much. Still, as a durable, thinking pitcher who's aware of his own weaknesses, Bannister isn't awful, and could move to the back of another team's rotation.

Fausto Carmona, 26, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

128.1

3.51

50

71

2010: $4.9m
2011: $6.1m
2012: $7m club option
2013: $9m club option
2014: $12m club option

Fausto's improved this year, and with the same live sinker as always and a ton of groundballs, he's fairly adept at avoiding the big inning. He'd be an intriguing, potentially long-term add to another team that believes it can straighten him out even further. The Indians, though, aren't prepared to just give him away, and the likelihood is that Carmona stays put.

Jeremy Guthrie, 31, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

125

4.46

35

69

2010: $3m
2011: arbitration-eligible
2012: arbitration-eligible

Guthrie's numbers don't live up to his stuff, but as a durable arm who's managed to survive on an absolutely awful Orioles team, he's already attracted some interest. Given how cheap he is and the fact that he's something of an experienced veteran on a young team, it's unclear how prepared Baltimore is to move him.

Edwin Jackson, 26, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

129.1

5.01

58

101

2010: $4.2m
2011: $8.35m

Jackson hasn't been plagued by the home run problems that've bit so many of his teammates, but he hasn't built off of his gains from 2009, and finds himself back on the market. That he still has a very intriguing live arm will keep some teams interested, although he would by no means represent a major addition.

Ted Lilly, 34, LHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

111.1

3.88

26

81

2010: $12m

While Roy Oswalt is the best arm left on the market, Lilly is probably the most broadly appealing, as he's cheaper and his no-trade clause should be less restrictive. Lilly could be dealt at any moment, and though he hasn't struck people out like he used to, his finesse repertoire still allows him to get by. The Cubs are taking a lot of calls.

Paul Maholm, 28, LHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

120

4.13

42

59

2010: $4.5m
2011: $5.75m
2012: $9.75m club option

Most of Maholm's major numbers are trending in the wrong direction, as his strikeouts and groundballs are down, and his walks are up. As a fairly cheap lefty who does well against lefties, though, he's out there as a potential number four or number five.

Gil Meche, 31, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

48.2

6.66

34

30

2010: $12m
2011: $12m

Meche has battled arm trouble this season and his numbers indicate as much, so he's really just here as an option for a team to pick him up in return for a bad contract. He's not really a guy you would add to help out down the stretch run.

Kevin Millwood, 35, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

114

5.84

38

86

2010: $12m

Millwood just came off the DL (arm strain) and struggled against Minnesota, so his stock is about as low as it can get. A string of better starts would put him on a lot of teams' radars, though, because he's a veteran workhorse with playoff experience. Probably more of an August trade candidate than a July trade candidate.

Brett Myers, 29, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

136

3.24

41

101

2010: $5.1m
2011: $8m mutual option

Myers has had a good year on a bad team in a bad ballpark, so he has a good deal of appeal, but the Astros seem to have placed too high of a price tag on him, making him a difficult sell. The righty has started in the World Series and offers a broad, four-pitch repertoire.

Ricky Nolasco, 27, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

124

4.50

25

110

2010: $3.8m
2011: arbitration-eligible
2012: arbitration-eligible

This might be a non-starter, as indications are that the Marlins don't really think of Nolasco as being available, but if someone came calling with a compelling offer, it's within the realm of possibility that one of the more underrated strikeout arms in the league could be on the move. He would come at a very hefty price.

Roy Oswalt, 32, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

129

3.42

34

120

2010: $15m
2011: $16m
2012: $16m club option

Everyone should be familiar with the Oswalt situation by now. Though a lot of teams have called, Oswalt has a no-trade clause, a high salary, and a high price tag affixed by the Astros. Something has to give in order for Oswalt to be moved. He is clearly a very, very talented arm, and the best available starter on the market, but the right conditions just may not come together.

Ben Sheets, 32, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

119.1

4.53

43

84

2010: $10m

Sheets' season appears to be over due to an elbow injury, so, yeah.

Jake Westbrook, 32, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

119.2

4.74

42

68

2010: $11m

The Indians are reportedly willing to deal one of Westbrook and Carmona, and Westbrook offers an intriguing, groundballing skillset as he's recovered from ligament replacement surgery in his arm. He's a very good lower-tier candidate to get moved, and has drawn attention from teams covering the whole spectrum, from New York to San Diego.

Randy Wolf, 33, LHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

128

5.20

63

82

2010: $9.25m
2011: $9.5m
2012: $9.5m
2013: $10m club option

I wouldn't expect anything to happen here, as Wolf is old, expensive, and pitching poorly, but he was very good as recently as 2009, so he could end up in a bad contract swap. He is a veteran who, in the past, has demonstrated the ability to miss a good number of bats.

Carlos Zambrano, 29, RHP

IP

ERA

BB

K

55.2

5.66

25

53

2010: $17.875m
2011: $17.875m
2012: $18m
2013: $19.25m vesting option

Only here because the Cubs would love to move him. Zambrano obviously has a ton of ability, but he might be one of the most untradeable assets in baseball, given his attitude problems and his mammoth contract. He would only ever get dealt in exchange for another bad contract or two, but because that possibility does exist, and because he has such a good arm, I couldn't bring myself to leave him out, here.

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