Iditarod 2012: Dallas Seavey Wins, Becomes Youngest Champion Ever

Dallas Seavey, 25, won the 2012 Iditarod, crossing the finish line in Nome, Alaska, Tuesday night with 9 dogs, becoming the youngest champion in the history of the race.

  • Live
23 Total Updates since March 3, 2012
  • Updates 17
  • Articles 6
  • All Updates 23

Iditarod 2012: Dallas Seavey Bests Ally Zirkle To Become Youngest-Ever Champion

Dallas Seavey made history Tuesday night when he won the 2012 Iditarod Sled Dog Race, becoming the youngest musher ever to do so, at just 25-years-old. He was followed into Nome, Alaska, by Ally Zirkle, who claimed second place. Ramey Smyth, who was once in 30th place, finished third.

Seavey's total time in the 975-mile race, stretching from Wasilla to Nome, was nine days, four hours, 29 minutes and 26 seconds, good for seventh-fastest ever on the northern route. Martin Buser owns the record, making the run in eight days and 22 hours in 2002. Seavey turned 25 during the race (March 4), making him the youngest champion in the history of the famous sled dog race (Carl Huntington was 26 when he won in 1974).

Zirkle finished exactly one hour after Seavey -- the eighth-quickest run. She led most of the race but Seavey's strategy to conserve speed was just too much to overcome the past few days.

"We built the winning team during the race," Seavey said, crediting the win on the mid-race restraint he showed even as others leaped ahead. "As soon as (other) teams really started coming together, they took off and started racing and tore it all apart."

Seavey was among the first people to greet Zirkle in Nome.

"That race was fun," he added. "Let's do this again next year."

"I'll get back to you after that first beer," Zirkle replied.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Dallas Seavey Wins, Becomes Youngest Champion In Race History

Led by his team of nine dogs, Dallas Seavey made his way down a crowded Front Street in Nome, Alaska, to become the champion of the 2012 Iditarod, crossing under the famous "burled arch" -- and the banner reading "End of Iditarod Sled Dog Race" -- some 10 days after he left the ceremonial starter in Anchorage. Seavey, just 25, becomes the youngest champion in the history of the race, which celebrated its 40th running this year.

Ally Zirkle, who led for much of the first half of the race, was expected to finish second, followed closely by Ramey Smyth, who came all the way back from 30th place to finish third. Zirkle left Safety, the final checkpoint before Nome, 69 minutes after Seavey.

Seavey, son of 2004 winner Mitch Seavey, and grandson of an Iditarod pioneer, took control of the race as it made its way toward the Norton Sound, relying on his strategy he employed through the trail -- rest early and often, and use that stored speed to run away from everyone over the final few days, and that's exactly what he did. Seavey was even frequently seen running alongside his sled, allowing his dogs to push even faster. His athletic background certainly helped -- Seavey is a former state high school wrestling champion at 130 pounds and a former national champion at 125 pounds.

Biditarod131whitemt

Dallas makes his final push toward Nome. (Marc Lester / Anchorage Daily News)

As the winner of the Iditarod, Dallas Seavey receives $50,4000 and a new pick-up truck. Second place takes home $46,500, and third gets $42,900.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Dallas Seavey On His Way To History-Making Run

The 2012 Iditarod is in its final hours, with Dallas Seavey on his way from the White Mountain checkpoint to the finish line in Nome. Seavey set out of the race's final 77 miles at 12:22 p.m. ET, which would put him into Nome around 10 p.m. Tuesday night.

Ally Zirkle left White Mountain 63 minutes after Seavey, but isn't giving up yet, even though catching him has been described as "nearly impossible." Zirkle herself so much as conceded the race to him in White Mountain, saying, "I'm on the defensive now."

Assuming Seavey, 25, keeps the lead and is the first to reach Nome, he will make Iditarod history, becoming the youngest champion ever to win the race. So how'd he do it? "Speed."

Other teams tried to claim the lead too early, he said, exhausting their dogs and fizzling away. "As soon as their teams really started coming together, they took off and started racing and tore it all to pieces."

"I felt like I was in control of this race as early as Ruby and maybe even Cripple, but we didn't even make a move until we were well on our way to Unalakleet," Seavey said.

For the final run, Seavey will wear pair of lightweight "snow sneakers," allowing him to run along side his sled for added speed.

The winner of the Iditarod gets $50,400, and a new pick-up truck.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Dallas Seavey Has The Race 'Sewn Up'

Dallas Seavey has the 2012 Iditarod "sewn up," this according to a man who might know, Mitch Seaevy, 2004 champion. "He knows how to do, and that's run dogs."

With only a few checkpoints remaining, Dallas Seavey is leading the Iditarod, pulling out of Elim at 7:25 p.m. ET Monday night, almost three hours ahead of Ally Zirkle. Seavey spent just six minutes in Elim before pressing on toward Golovin, the last stop before White Mountain and its eight-hour layover.

But the race is far from over -- While the official times show Seavey leaving well before Zirkle, it doesn't show that he stopped just 20 minutes outside of town to rest his team there, out of sight from the other mushers. Just more head games in the Iditarod writes former musher Sebastian Schnuelle:

As soon as Dallas had left his camp spot, Aliy Zirkle came around the corner, urging her dogs to keep on going. They also looked focused. Those two will have a hell of a race to White Mountain. Apperantly at some point to Elim, Aliy had already caught Dallas once. And both have to look over their shoulder for Ramey Smyth!

Indeed, recent GPS readings showed that Zirkle was just one mile behind Seavey. And as the race between those two heats up, they'll both be keeping an eye on Ramey Smyth who has come all the way back from 30th place to third, hot on the trail of the two leaders.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Dallas Seavey Takes Lead As Race Enters Final Stretch

Aaron Burmeister was the first musher out of Unalakleet late Sunday afternoon, a checkpint some 220 miles from the finish in Nome, but GPS tracking shows he has been passed on the trail by Dallas Seavey, who is now leading the 2012 Iditarod. Ally Zirkle is running in third place.

The stretch from Unalakleet is the beginning of the trail going along the coast of the Norton Sound, taking mushers through Shaktoolik, Koyuk, Elim, Golovin, White Mountain, Safety and then, the finish line in Nome. But many expect that the first person to reach White Mountain -- and its mandator eight-hour layover -- will win the Iditarod, which might change the strategy:

Rather than rest their dogs at checkpoints between Unalakleet and White Mountain, a musher could split the overall 170-mile-or-so run into comfortable, bite-sized segments, resting wherever they see fit along the trail.

The Iditarod now allows mushers to use GPS units in their sleds, which makes it easier to determine precisely how far they've traveled between checkpoints. Zirkle said that's how she gauged her run through Ruby.

As the Iditarod nears its conclusion, and as strategy potential changes, the race may very well come down to its most obvious factor: speed.

Dallas Seavey is planning longer runs along the coast, and it is looking like his team is up for the challenge, benefitting from the extra rest Seavey gave the dogs earlier in the race.

"We were taking extra rest. We were building speed," Seavey said of his end-game tactics. "And speed pays dividends and it will last for as long as I need it to, which will be somewhere around Nome."

Seavey's turbo-charged dogs could trail the leader to White Mountain by as much as 40 minutes and still win, he said. He's already started running alongside his sled at times.

One thing is for certain, no matter the race strategy: this section of the Iditarod has the potential to be some of the most unforgiving miles:

Shaktoolik to Koyuk from Art Aldrich on Vimeo.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Map, Weather And More For Sunday

Though it may not seem like it from looking at the overall standings, Saturday was full of strategy in the Iditarod. At one point, Aliy Zirkle seized the lead heading into camp at Galena. But by the time the day was over, the top of the leaderboard was a virtual dead heat, with five mushers all within about three hours of each other.

From the race blog:

After two days of these parries, the front group finds itself assembled, AGAIN, in Kaltag, more or less even up. With apologies to whom we may have missed, my group of Iditarod insiders believe we have the following contenders: Aliy, Dallas Seavey the Younger, John Baker the 2012 champ, Aaron Burmeister, Jeff King, and Mitch Seavey.

Aliy commands the race, but it appears Dallas and Burmeister are now driving the fastest teams.

The weather is still frigid on the northern portion of the Iditarod course, with temperatures dipping well below zero, nearly 20 degrees below in some places. The leaders are nearing the home stretch as they head towards Unakleet and beyond, with just about 200 miles to go.

Route_northern_medium

Coverage of the 2012 Iditarod can be found on the official website. With a subscription, one can track riders by way of GPS and watch video from the various checkpoints. For continued updates throughout the race, keep with this StoryStream.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Map, Weather And More

With the Iditarod set to make an exciting finish, most of the mushing teams are taking their mandatory eight-hour breaks or just finishing up their eight-hour breaks and heading out. With half of the teams settled at Galena while many remain at Ruby, it will be a chilly day for the race on Saturday.

At the Galena checkpoint the current conditions are 19 degrees below zero, but with the wind it feels like a balmy 32 degrees below zero. It will get as warm as 1 degree above zero around Galena by late afternoon before the temperatures take another dive.

At the Ruby checkpoint, it's only 10 degrees below zero but it feels like 22 degrees below zero. The high is forecasted to reach 4 degrees by mid-day. The mushers will look to get fair weather at most of the check points with minimal wind and not much precipitation.

Coverage of the 2012 Iditarod can be found on the official website. With a subscription, one can track riders by way of GPS and watch video from the various checkpoints. For continued updates throughout the race, keep with this StoryStream.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Ally Zirkle Reclaims Lead As Seaveys Rest

Ally Zirkle spent just nine minutes in Ruby, tearing through the checkpoint to reclaim the lead in the 2012 Iditarod early Friday morning in central Alaska. Zirkle was there just long enough to drop a dog -- Viper was "looking a little thin," she said -- and comment that it's long overdue for the famous sled dog race to have a woman winner.

It's about time a woman won the Iditarod again, [a fan] told Zirkle. The last time a woman won was 1990, when Susan Butcher won the last of her four titles.

"Women gotta get out there back in the front," the fan said.

"We gotta at least try, don't we?" Zirkle replied.

There are still 12 other mushers in Ruby, the first checkpoint on the Yukon River, including Mitch and Dallas Seavey, John Baker, Jeff King and another woman, DeeDee Jonrowe.

Typically, the first musher to reach Ruby wins $3,500 and, perhaps more importantly during the Iditarod, a gourmet meal, but this year a lack of sponsorship meant no such prize. Instead, Mitch Seavey heated up some of his own frozen spaghetti.

Seavey had to stay in Ruby until at least 6 p.m. EST, opting to take his eight-hour layover there -- all mushers must take an eight-hour layover at one of the four villages on the Yukon River (Ruby, Galena, Nulato or Kaltag). Mitch was joined for the layover by his son, Dallas. It's expected that both will then pass Zirkle once she decides to take her eight-hour rest.

Elsewhere in the race, a special congratulations to Jim Lanier, the first musher into Cripple, the halfway point, and the winner of $3,000 in gold nuggets. What was his secret? No sleeping -- the 71-year-old totaled just three hours of sleep in four days.

Lanier mushed through McGrath, where many mushers "take their 24" to enjoy bottomless pie pans and cooked-to-order cheeseburgers. But when he hit Ophir, 73 miles down the trail, Lanier encountered 1989 Iditarod champion Joe Runyun, he said.

"'You know, you should go for that gold in Cripple,'" Lanier recalls Runyun saying. "I hadn't really thought of that," Lanier said. Fourteen and a half hours later, the musher pulled into Cripple behind lead dogs April and October and collected his spoils. Everyone keeps asking him what he'll do with the gold. [...]

Lanier has a couple of ideas of his own. "I'd like to get a really nice lead dog," he said. "But I know what's more likely to happen. It'll wind up hanging from my wife's neck."

Coverage of the 2012 Iditarod can be found on the official website. With a subscription, one can track riders by way of GPS and watch video from the various checkpoints. For continued updates throughout the race, keep with this StoryStream.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: The Race For The Gold Nuggets Is On

Jim Lanier, 71, a veteran of 14 previous Iditarods, has grabbed the lead in the 2012 Iditarod ... but only in name, really.

Lanier was indeed the first musher out of the Ophir checkpoint, followed closely by Trent Herbst, leaving the ghost town at 3:25 a.m. EST on Thursday, but neither have yet to take their mandatory 24-hour layover.

So really, looking down the leaderboard, the 2012 iditarod is being led by Mitch Seavey, the 2004 champion. He's followed by Ally Zirkle; his son, Dallas Seavey; four-time winner Jeff King; and John Baker, the Iditarod's defending champ.

But it's hardly a futile effort by Lanier. If he can be the first musher to reach the town of Cripple, the halfway point, he'll receive a price of $3,000, paid in gold nuggets.

Elsewhere in the Alaskan wilderness, the 2012 Iditarod has its first scratch. Actually, it has its first pair of scratches.

Silvia Furtwängler, a rookie from Norway, ended her race late Wednesday night in Nikolai, citing concern for her health. Shortly after her, Ryan Redington, grandson of Iditarod founder Ray Redington, also scratched.

"I talked it over with the race judge. I made my decision ... " [...]

"We tried preparing for this for a couple years now for this team, and things just didn't go right," Redington said. "It's a bum decision, and I feel real bad, but it's what I got to do now."

Ophir, Nikolai, Cripple ... with so many checkpoints mentioned, ever wondered what it sounds like at one? In short: it's loud.

Coverage of the 2012 Iditarod can be found on the official website. With a subscription, one can track riders by way of GPS and watch video from the various checkpoints. For continued updates throughout the race, keep with this StoryStream.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Map, Weather And More For Thursday

All is quiet on the course as the 2012 Iditarod as many mushers opted to take their mandatory 24-hour rest. Though the rest itself is part of the race strategy, most of the field bedded down on Wednesday afternoon or evening. Where they did it, though -- Takotna, Ophir or otherwise -- varied.

Thursday will involve the run to Cripple, a difficult 73-mile stretch. From Cripple, mushers will head to Ruby, which is another 70 miles away. The stretches between camps get longer, the temperatures get colder and the racing gets tougher from here on out.

The temperature is cold once again, though not too far below zero as of late Wednesday night. In Takotna and Ophir, it's around 17 degrees, though the mercury dips below zero in Cripple, where temperatures are notoriously frigid.

Coverage of the 2012 Iditarod can be found on the official website. With a subscription, one can track riders by way of GPS and watch video from the various checkpoints. For continued updates throughout the race, keep with this StoryStream.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Ally Zirkle First To Takotna As Many Take 24-Hour Layover

And on the fourth day of the 2012 Iditarod, they rested.

Led by Ally Zirkle, the lead group of mushers plowed through the McGrath checkpoint late Tuesday night -- Zirkle stayed four minutes, just long enough to accept her award for being the first to reach the checkpoint -- before moving on to Takotna, the site where many will take their mandatory 24-hour rest.

Zirkle pulled into the small town known for its fresh pies at 3:30 a.m. EST early Wednesday morning and was quickly joined by John Baker, Mitch Seavey, Jeff King, Dallas Seavey, Ray Redington, Jr., Paul Gebhardt and Hugh Neff, all of whom arrived in McGrath within three hours of the race leader.

But not everyone made the 18-mile run from McGrath to Takotna. Four-time champion Lance Mackey, who arrived with two dogs in his sled, opted to take his 24-hour layover in McGrath, citing the health of his team as the main reason why:

The four-time champion told Iditarod Insider that he'd take his 24-hour layover at the checkpoint, a choice none of the other frontrunners made.

"I race my team first and my competition second," he said. "I've always said I'm not gonna win the Iditarod at the expense of my team."

And still others bypassed the layover altogether, with Martin Buser and son Rohn tearing through Takotna to take the lead ... kinda:

Martin arrived at 8:31 a.m. and left one minute later, a move that gives him the Iditarod lead.

But it comes with a big fat asterisk. [...]

The Busers still need to take their 24-hour layovers, so their status as race leaders doesn't mean much.

Once those taking their 24-hour layovers pull out of Takotna, they'll run the 23 miles to Ophir, a ghost town, before turning north and making their way for the Yukon River.

Coverage of the 2012 Iditarod can be found on the official website. With a subscription, one can track riders by way of GPS and watch video from the various checkpoints. For continued updates throughout the race, keep with this StoryStream.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Map, Weather And More For Wednesday

The 2012 Iditarod race is now well into the first week, and the leaders are getting close to the halfway point. When they reach the next checkpoint in McGrath, nine checkpoints from the start of the race in Anchorage, they will be 646 miles from the finish in Nome.

Mushers are required to take a 24-hour layoff during the race, and the preview of the current stage of the race from the official Iditarod website notes that the checkpoint after the stage between Nikolai and McGrath is a popular one for that layover.

The McGrath checkpoint in recent years has been in a house a couple of blocks east of the airport, right on the river. It has become a popular place for mushers to take their mandatory 24-hour layovers because of the excellent facilities there, including a 24-hour kitchen for mushers and staff.

The leading mushers left Nikolai on Tuesday night and should arrive in McGrath sometime on Wednesday. The current weather conditions aren't bad at all; it's warmer in Nikolai and McGrath than it is elsewhere along the race route. You can find the race map and checkpoints list here.

Coverage of the 2012 Iditarod can be found on the official website. With a subscription, one can track riders by way of GPS and watch video from the various checkpoints. For continued updates throughout the race, keep it with this StoryStream.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Ally Zirkle Leads Group Of Mushers Into Nikolai Checkpoint

Ally Zirkle grabbed the lead in the 2012 Iditarod when she was the first into the Nikolai checkpoint, arriving at 1:14 p.m. EST with her 16 dogs. But she is not without company, as some of the sports' biggest names arrived shortly after Zirkle: defending champion John Baker, four-time champion Lance Mackey, Hugh Neff, Ray Redington Jr., Mitch Seavey and Jeff King (in that order) all rolled into Nikolai within an hour and 40 minutes of Zirkle, last year's 11th-place finisher.

After Nikolai, a small village of about 100 people in the middle of Alaska, the teams set their sights on McGrath, a town about 48 miles away and, with nearly 400 inhabitants, one of the trail's larger checkpoints -- "this thriving community has two stores, a bar and a restaurant."

It could be a bit longer than originally anticipated for the teams to reach McGrath (windchill as of this posting: 9 F), however, due to the Alaskan winter:

The Iditarod Insider reports that 6 to 10 inches of snow fell last night and today around Nikolai.

"[Trail breakers] say the snow is a light powder and shouldn't be a major issue for the teams but we likely will see a decrease in speed as the teams head on to McGrath," according to Insider.

It's still early in the race, but somewhat amazingly, no one has scratched. All 66 teams are still in it, with 74-year-old Dan Seavey, the oldest musher in this year's race, bringing up the rear.

On Monday, the Anchorage Daily News caught up with Seavey to ask who has the faster team -- his son, Mitch (currently in sixth place), or his grandson, Dallas (10th), both of whom are racing in the 2012 Iditarod:

74-year-old Iditarod racer Dan Seavey from Kyle Hopkins@adn.com on Vimeo.

"Mitch has never whined that he about cut his finger off last year." Ah, the Iditarod.

Coverage of the 2012 Iditarod can be found on the official website. With a subscription, one can track riders by way of GPS and watch video from the various checkpoints. For continued updates throughout the race, keep it with this StoryStream.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Map, Weather And More For Tuesday

The 2012 Iditarod enters the middle of its first week on Tuesday, and the teams are still just easing into the two-week journey. The stretches involving strategy and planning will come, of course, but the dogs and their mushers typically take the first few days of the race to get their bearings.

The Iditarod map route shows the route from Anchorage to Nome; for reference, most of the lead teams were leaving Rohn, the seventh checkpoint since Anchorage, late Monday night Eastern time. The current Iditarod leaderboard can provide more information on just which teams those are.

As for the Iditarod weather conditions, as one would expect for Alaska in March, it's cold. Temperatures were in the teens with light snow in Skwentna, just before Nome on the route, and dipped into single digits in Nikolai, site of the first checkpoint after Rohn, with some severe weather alerts. The race thus far has been mostly without inclement weather, but that could obviously change.

Coverage of the 2012 Iditarod can be found on the official website. With a subscription, one can track riders by way of GPS and watch video from the various checkpoints. For continued updates throughout the race, keep it with this StoryStream.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Ray Redington, Jr., Hugh Neff First Into Rainy Pass

Ray Redington, Jr., was the first musher into Rainy Pass, the fourth checkpoint on the 2012 Iditarod trail, and at almost 3,800-feet , the highest point on the famous sleddog race. Redington, the 36-year-old grandson of Iditarod co-founder Joe Redington, checked in at 1:02 p.m. EST with 16 dogs. He was followed by Hugh Neff, fresh off a win at the Yukon Quest, just three minutes later.

Both mushers immediately set out with their top priority at checkpoints: The dogs.

Unfortunately, some animals had gotten into the food and his bags were both ripped open. Both teams parked right next to each other. I could not help but notice that Hugh was very efficient -- amazingly focused, his team bedded down long before Ray. While Ray walked back and forth a few times to put down the straw, Hugh had that done in one simple step. He gave each of his dogs a snack before going to work on his team.

Redington and Neff were part of a group of five mushers that arrived in Finger Lake within a 25-minute span, along with defending champion John Baker and four-time winner Lance Mackey. The run from Finger Lake to Rainy Pass is just 30 miles, but treacherous, as it features the infamous Happy River Steps:

Fingerlake Checkpoint from Art Aldrich on Vimeo.

Mackey was the first out of Finger Lake, but was passed along the way at some point.

After Rainy Pass, the mushers make their way along the 32 mile-stretch to Rohn, a site that marks one of the original Iditarod roadhouses for dogs carrying mail.

Oh, and if you were wondering, the temperature in Rainy Pass as of this posting: -9, with a windchill of -21.

Coverage of the 2012 Iditarod, including current standings, can be found on the official website.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Map, Weather And Standings For Monday

The 2012 Iditarod is finally under way after Saturday's ceremonial start and Sunday's mostly calm run to the first real checkpoint in Yentna Station. Over the weekend, the race began with the traditional start in Anchorage, after which the field lined up once again for the restart, or real start, in Willow. The entire field is now on the course, battling the conditions in Alaska as they head toward Nome.

The early part of the Iditarod is mostly a feeling out period. The strategy for the race will come into play later -- including when and where to take mandatory rest periods. Most of the teams are plodding along on their journey, with quite a long way to go until even the halfway point.

A map of the route can be found here and the current leaderboard, which takes into account where the mushers are and when they checked in and out of the camps along the route, can be found here.

The weather along the Iditarod course remains frigid, but without a lot of moisture in the air. As of Sunday night, temperatures ranged from the low teens near the start of the race to some 20 degrees below zero further north. Thus far, the race has been pretty mild as far as the weather is concerned.

Coverage of the 2012 Iditarod can be found on the official website. With a subscription, one can track riders by way of GPS and watch video from the various checkpoints. For continued updates throughout the race, keep it with this StoryStream.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Map, Weather, Standings And More

Day One of the world's most celebrated dogsled race is in the books, as all of the racers have passed the checkpoint in Willow, Alaska in their quest for Iditarod immortality. Willow is where the race officially begins after the ceremonial start from Anchorage on Saturday. The leaderboard hasn't changed from the official starting order, but once the racers got past Willow, it was officially on like Donkey Kong.

The weather is getting even colder — it's currently 5 degrees Fahrenheit in Willow — and the farther Northwest they go, the colder and darker it will get. You can see from the map that the race isn't getting any easier

Route_northern_medium

The next checkpoint is 30 miles from Willow in Yentna station, 892 miles from the finish line. For the first time in race history, the Iditarod is less than 1,000 miles, but it still won't be wrapping up anytime soon.

Coverage of the 2012 Iditarod can be found on the official website. With a subscription, one can watch video of the ceremonial start, track riders by way of GPS and watch video from the various checkpoints. For continued update throughout the race, keep it with this StoryStream.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Mushers And Dog Teams Competing In This Year's Race

On Saturday, 66 mushers and their teams of dogs will leave Anchorage, Alaska, as the 2012 Iditarod gets underway. The sled dog race spans 975 miles, ending in Nome, Alaska.

Continue

Iditarod 2012: Map, Weather And More For Saturday's Start

The 2012 Iditarod begins at 2 p.m. EST on Saturday as riders leave Anchorage following the ceremonial start. Here is the weather, a map and more information on the start of the race.

Continue

Iditarod 2012 Preview: Facts And History Of The World's Premier Sled Dog Race

The 2012 Iditarod begins on Saturday. Read about the history and records of one of the world's most famous races.

Continue
X
Log In Sign Up

forgot?
Log In Sign Up

Forgot password?

We'll email you a reset link.

If you signed up using a 3rd party account like Facebook or Twitter, please login with it instead.

Forgot password?

Try another email?

Almost done,

Join SBNation.com

You must be a member of SBNation.com to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at SBNation.com. You should read them.

Join SBNation.com

You must be a member of SBNation.com to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at SBNation.com. You should read them.

Spinner

Authenticating

Great!

Choose an available username to complete sign up.

In order to provide our users with a better overall experience, we ask for more information from Facebook when using it to login so that we can learn more about our audience and provide you with the best possible experience. We do not store specific user data and the sharing of it is not required to login with Facebook.