Controversial Miami probe defended by anonymous NCAA investigator

Steve Mitchell-US PRESSWIRE

An anonymous NCAA investigator defended the methods Miami investigators used to get information on the case. Here's why their explanation may not hold water.

When NCAA President Mark Emmert held a press conference to say that NCAA investigators may have acted improperly during their investigation of the University of Miami football program, it was another opportunity to criticize the NCAA for its bizarre rules and processes, which they seem to disregard whenever they want. However, one anonymous NCAA investigator spoke out to the Sun-Sentinel, saying that the investigators involved in the Miami case did nothing wrong:

"There are a lot of us wondering just what the purpose of (Emmert's news conference) was - and why it happened in the first place,'' the investigator said.

The investigators in question supposedly used a bankruptcy proceeding to ask questions related to the NCAA probe. If those investigators are attorneys licensed in the state of Indiana, asking questions would constitute a breach of the Indiana Rules of Professional Conduct, and even if they're not, it was arguably an abuse of process. Athnet's John Infante summed it up nicely:

But between professional conduct rules and abuse of process, the claim that there is no serious ethical or legal question is not credible. This is about more than just internal NCAA policy. This is about the NCAA investigators using a tool of the court that it does not and should not have, to accomplish something for which it was never intended.

With the NCAA now investigating its own investigation into Miami, the timeline on potential sanctions for the Hurricanes has been pushed back indefinitely. If you're the type of person that finds the absurd entertaining, this is the story for you.

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