Finding the arch-nemeses for every National League team

Ronald Martinez

Which players hit your team more than they hit anyone else? Thanks to Baseball-Reference.com, we can figure it out.

Welcome to the conclusion of Baseball Nation's exciting series, "Find evidence to support your long-held belief that (player) killed your team." That title didn't sing, but it's pretty much what you're here for. Using Baseball Reference's Play Index, which is one of the best things the Internet has ever produced, we've found the hitters who did the best against every National League team (min. 100 at-bats).

But that's just by raw OPS, and you'll see a lot of names you'll expect because they were good against everyone. It shouldn't surprise you that Barry Bonds shows up in this article, for example. So we're also looking at tOPS+, which measures how out of whack the split is when compared with the hitter's career numbers.

For example, if Neifi Perez was a career .267/.297/.375 hitter, but he hit .388/.419/.578 against a specific team, he would have an incredibly high tOPS+ against that team. Of course, Neifi Perez isn't going to make an article like this, but you get the point.

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Arizona Diamondbacks (Full table)
OPS: Manny Ramirez (1.305)
tOPS+: Adam Everett (189)

Manny Ramirez wasn't on the Dodgers long, but he was there long enough to harass a few NL West teams.

Rk Player PA HR RBI BA OBP SLG OPS BAbip tOPS+
1 Adam Everett 136 5 21 .331 .378 .554 .931 .357 189
2 Dante Bichette 132 11 30 .372 .439 .752 1.192 .323 181
3 Alfonso Soriano 161 17 38 .333 .404 .757 1.161 .330 176
4 Andres Torres 185 5 20 .321 .395 .564 .958 .397 169
5 Chris Denorfia 113 7 13 .362 .398 .629 1.027 .356 166
6 Manny Ramirez 157 12 32 .411 .522 .782 1.305 .438 161
7 Austin Kearns 179 10 30 .323 .413 .587 1.001 .367 160
8 Ty Wigginton 178 10 25 .361 .390 .608 .998 .382 160
9 Morgan Ensberg 116 8 14 .347 .426 .653 1.080 .370 157
10 Todd Hollandsworth 158 12 29 .311 .350 .642 .992 .337 153

I kind of figured Adam Everett was on the Diamondbacks the whole time, to be honest.

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Atlanta Braves (Full table)
OPS: Shawn Green (1.087)
tOPS+: Nick Esasky (172)

That's weird. There's a dearth of hitters who were active from 1993 through the 2000s or so. Must be a fluke.

Rk Player PA HR RBI BA OBP SLG OPS BAbip tOPS+
1 Nick Esasky 230 18 47 .306 .399 .673 1.073 .321 172
2 Willie Harris 171 4 20 .305 .427 .475 .902 .379 168
3 Sherry Magee 128 0 9 .346 .444 .477 .921 .359 163
4 Glenn Braggs 137 6 20 .336 .409 .525 .933 .376 157
5 Randy Winn 175 4 20 .368 .428 .546 .974 .377 156
6 Shawn Green 311 24 63 .348 .428 .659 1.087 .340 154
7 Tommie Agee 293 16 30 .312 .373 .564 .937 .322 154
8 Ed Fitz Gerald 127 0 19 .345 .397 .440 .836 .421 154
9 Marty Callaghan 115 0 10 .370 .404 .444 .848 .400 153
10 Greg Brock 241 12 30 .285 .402 .530 .932 .300 152

I've never seen a Fitz Gerald. Is that weird, or are there hundreds of thousands of them out there? Even before I clicked on the link, I knew he was a backup catcher. Ed Fitz Gerald is somehow the catcheriest name in any table here, even if it's kind of an unusual name.

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Chicago Cubs (Full table)
OPS: Mark McGwire (1.285)
tOPS+: Jerry White (199)

Jerry White was a career .253/.337/.363 hitter, and he was never a starter. For whatever reason, the Cubs traded him six months after acquiring him, and he didn't take kindly to the swap. White wasn't in the majors in 1984, and the Cubs won their division. Correlation is usually causation, as the Internet likes to remind you.

Rk Player PA HR RBI BA OBP SLG OPS BAbip tOPS+
1 Jerry White 116 4 19 .408 .457 .592 1.049 .437 199
2 Bennie Warren 156 8 27 .326 .404 .565 .969 .333 186
3 Jackie Brandt 189 7 31 .366 .431 .610 1.041 .390 182
4 Jim Morrison 206 10 38 .362 .405 .611 1.016 .383 179
5 John Olerud 134 6 18 .414 .500 .703 1.203 .435 177
6 F.P. Santangelo 131 3 21 .342 .405 .577 .981 .376 176
7 Clyde McCullough 167 5 36 .318 .384 .527 .911 .311 170
8 Carl Everett 165 10 41 .369 .421 .671 1.092 .391 169
9 Jeff Blauser 299 15 48 .351 .413 .611 1.023 .356 167
10 Jerry Turner 131 6 24 .310 .392 .558 .950 .322 167

Better nickname for #4: The Lizard King or The Overrated Poet?

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Cincinnati Reds (Full table)
OPS: Barry Bonds (1.184)
tOPS+: Paul Bako (195)

Theory: Every team has a backup catcher of doom. That is, a backup catcher that always seems to hit well against your team. For the Reds, it's Paul Bako.

Rk Player PA HR RBI BA OBP SLG OPS BAbip tOPS+
1 Paul Bako 143 3 26 .317 .413 .508 .921 .361 195
2 Matt Lawton 138 10 24 .361 .435 .697 1.132 .340 185
3 Sixto Lezcano 129 8 29 .327 .473 .663 1.136 .325 182
4 Joe Koppe 134 3 19 .301 .396 .496 .891 .356 175
5 Brady Clark 217 6 27 .352 .444 .575 1.020 .358 173
6 Honus Wagner 123 1 13 .394 .475 .471 .946 .404 173
7 Felipe Lopez 148 4 16 .353 .419 .564 .983 .391 170
8 Shane Andrews 142 10 34 .305 .366 .609 .976 .354 168
9 Barry Bonnell 132 3 15 .364 .412 .545 .958 .398 168
10 Dante Bichette 286 20 74 .379 .413 .709 1.121 .373 165

I love it when guys like Honus Wagner show up in these searches. He was Honus Wagner to the rest of the league, but he meant even more to a team like the Reds. Of course, I think there were three teams back then, and they all took turns playing each other.

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Colorado Rockies (Full table)
OPS: Mark McGwire (1.271)
tOPS: Neifi Perez (195)

LOLOLOLOLOLOL. YOU EARNED THIS, ROCKIES. OH, JUST DESSERTS. THIS WAS ALL YOUR FAULT, COLORADO. REAP WHAT YOU HATH SOWN.

Sorry. I get a little irrational when it comes to Neifi Perez.

Rk Player PA HR RBI BA OBP SLG OPS BAbip tOPS+
1 Neifi Perez 128 3 17 .388 .419 .578 .997 .408 195
2 Matt Stairs 112 11 33 .380 .446 .770 1.216 .380 187
3 Robin Ventura 127 6 29 .410 .488 .667 1.155 .425 185
4 Jeff Conine 295 16 63 .375 .447 .684 1.131 .403 183
5 David Segui 180 10 36 .379 .461 .654 1.115 .372 176
6 Aaron Hill 137 5 21 .363 .423 .629 1.052 .377 175
7 Kevin Stocker 145 4 23 .319 .431 .496 .926 .382 172
8 Richard Hidalgo 191 12 40 .358 .450 .686 1.136 .352 170
9 Jeff Blauser 233 10 41 .340 .425 .599 1.024 .368 168
10 Sean Berry 171 11 34 .315 .415 .636 1.052 .298 167

Look at the sheer number of at-bats for Jeff Conine! That doesn't make sense, seeing as a) Conine spent most of his time in the NL East, but b) also spent nine years in the AL.

Also of note: One of those players was the cover player for a Baseball Prospectus once. That's why they have a few different players on every cover now. That and Josh Phelps.

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Miami Marlins (Full table)
OPS: Barry Bonds (1.116)
tOPS+: Tom Pagnozzi (180)

Starting to get the sense that Barry Bonds annoyed a lot of teams.

Rk Player PA HR RBI BA OBP SLG OPS BAbip tOPS+
1 Tom Pagnozzi 132 5 18 .352 .385 .541 .926 .373 180
2 Jeff Cirillo 173 3 21 .396 .494 .604 1.099 .430 175
3 Chris Widger 126 3 19 .318 .405 .536 .941 .368 173
4 Robby Thompson 122 5 11 .333 .421 .562 .983 .441 167
5 Matt Diaz 213 10 29 .360 .417 .608 1.026 .420 164
6 Andre Ethier 167 7 30 .397 .464 .623 1.087 .432 160
7 Rod Barajas 145 6 24 .309 .338 .559 .897 .350 156
8 Todd Walker 159 7 29 .359 .411 .592 1.003 .361 154
9 Phil Nevin 178 8 33 .356 .449 .577 1.027 .398 153
10 Adrian Beltre 226 9 34 .350 .413 .611 1.024 .378 153

That's a fairly catcher-heavy list as far as these things go. Robby Thompson didn't play against the Marlins for long, but he loved the expansion-era pitching when he did.

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Los Angeles Dodgers (Full table)
OPS: Gary Sheffield (1.093)
tOPS+: Jim Eisenreich (191)

I wonder how many of these players ended up with the team they bludgeoned. It can't be a coincidence that for years and years, Gary Sheffield caused the Dodgers great pain, and then they eventually traded their homegrown, All-Star catcher for him.

Rk Player PA HR RBI BA OBP SLG OPS BAbip tOPS+
1 Jim Eisenreich 232 7 46 .405 .468 .620 1.087 .413 191
2 Gordon Slade 145 2 12 .331 .374 .500 .874 .342 171
3 Cory Sullivan 158 3 17 .357 .420 .529 .949 .416 167
4 Johnny Estrada 118 4 14 .351 .390 .568 .957 .365 165
5 Jack Shepard 113 2 11 .350 .409 .470 .879 .393 153
6 Don Gutteridge 277 7 48 .309 .332 .517 .849 .313 151
7 Gene Oliver 310 16 48 .318 .385 .540 .925 .324 149
8 Lew McCarty 150 0 10 .349 .425 .434 .859 .375 147
9 Todd Benzinger 151 7 19 .291 .364 .485 .849 .333 147
10 Lee Magee 125 0 4 .304 .345 .446 .791 .321 146

Cory Sullivan is a great example of a player who isn't going to be remembered by anyone but Rockies diehards and Dodgers fans who know how to hold a grudge.

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Milwaukee Brewers (Full table)
OPS: Barry Bonds (1.346)
tOPS+: Darryl Motley (179)

Bonds again, and this time he has one of the higher OPSs in baseball history for any player against a specific team. I knew he was a jerk to the Padres, but I didn't remember the Brewers. They probably remembered.

Rk Player PA HR RBI BA OBP SLG OPS BAbip tOPS+
1 Darryl Motley 114 8 16 .321 .368 .594 .963 .286 179
2 Jeff Huson 128 2 16 .307 .365 .465 .830 .324 178
3 Troy Tulowitzki 142 10 28 .395 .465 .750 1.215 .433 176
4 Jason Kubel 121 9 26 .369 .438 .670 1.108 .397 174
5 Jose Castillo 164 6 31 .320 .372 .558 .930 .345 173
6 Colby Rasmus 149 8 24 .296 .405 .568 .973 .345 164
7 Kosuke Fukudome 194 8 31 .323 .394 .605 .999 .348 163
8 Danny Bautista 147 9 29 .326 .352 .616 .968 .319 162
9 Brian Jordan 148 6 23 .380 .419 .606 1.025 .418 159
10 Scott Hatteberg 148 5 24 .339 .422 .581 1.002 .349 159

Again, even by Troy Tulowitzki standards, he's hit the Brewers especially hard. The cameo from Fukudome is pretty amusing -- just under a fifth of his career home runs came against the Brewers.

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New York Mets (Full table)
OPS: Joey Votto (1.143)
tOPS+: Brian Johnson (180)

Joey Votto hits everyone. Brian Johnson, though ...

Rk Player PA HR RBI BA OBP SLG OPS BAbip tOPS+
1 Brian Johnson 108 8 23 .333 .355 .637 .992 .356 180
2 Claudell Washington 241 12 30 .330 .423 .578 1.001 .337 168
3 Endy Chavez 146 2 16 .328 .372 .530 .902 .356 165
4 Ed Spiezio 119 5 12 .295 .364 .514 .879 .333 165
5 Jeff Stone 117 2 15 .355 .402 .514 .916 .434 160
6 Dave Clark 133 6 25 .342 .414 .547 .961 .410 157
7 Rico Carty 347 15 67 .380 .460 .607 1.066 .401 156
8 Ivan Rodriguez 163 4 28 .348 .438 .578 1.016 .391 156
9 Kevin Orie 126 3 11 .316 .381 .526 .907 .347 154
10 Yorvit Torrealba 119 3 13 .311 .390 .505 .895 .358 154

Johnson is a legend in Giants lore for a home run he hit in 1997 against the Dodgers, but apparently he was a consistent problem for the Mets, too. In case you were wondering, yes, Ed Spiezio is Scott's dad.

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Philadelphia Phillies (Full table)
OPS: Vladimir Guerrero (1.204)
tOPS+: Ted Martinez (211)

Rk Player PA HR RBI BA OBP SLG OPS BAbip tOPS+
1 Ted Martinez 138 1 16 .366 .387 .519 .906 .431 211
2 Jerry Kindall 149 9 22 .284 .318 .546 .864 .333 186
3 Miguel Cairo 148 2 14 .362 .417 .523 .940 .395 178
4 Jeff Treadway 137 4 18 .371 .423 .565 .988 .378 177
5 Fred Brickell 153 4 30 .351 .422 .534 .956 .350 173
6 Wally Pipp 200 5 42 .389 .448 .577 1.026 .375 171
7 Joe Marty 120 6 25 .343 .403 .574 .977 .348 171
8 Alan Wiggins 120 0 7 .368 .432 .434 .866 .398 171
9 John Olerud 152 9 35 .384 .480 .696 1.176 .382 170
10 Scott Hairston 135 12 25 .307 .348 .677 1.025 .318 168

Did you ever notice that when an AMC series needs a weaselly boss, they name him Ted? The two Teds from Mad Men and Breaking Bad could probably switch roles without a lot of us catching on. Ted Martinez was a little-used utility player for four different teams, and he was a career .240/.270/.309 hitter. That's a .309 slugging percentage, mostly because he had 73 career extra-base hits in 1,480 at-bats.

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Pittsburgh Pirates (Full table)
OPS: Jermaine Dye (1.232)
tOPS+: Jermaine Dye (193)

Of all the hitters to hit the Pirates hard over the years, no one did it more effectively than Dye. He also wasn't that good against anyone else.

Rk Player PA HR RBI BA OBP SLG OPS BAbip tOPS+
1 Jermaine Dye 148 11 40 .382 .446 .786 1.232 .386 193
2 Mark Reynolds 143 10 25 .376 .437 .728 1.165 .463 183
3 Lee King 122 5 24 .313 .342 .591 .933 .337 175
4 Bruce Edwards 216 9 37 .326 .405 .595 .999 .321 174
5 Roy Hartsfield 160 4 11 .333 .427 .489 .916 .366 168
6 Ron Hodges 151 3 23 .336 .433 .456 .889 .345 168
7 Jay Johnstone 244 5 33 .355 .422 .547 .969 .374 167
8 Craig Paquette 118 4 21 .324 .362 .556 .918 .373 167
9 Don Hahn 138 1 11 .336 .430 .397 .826 .362 166
10 Bob Usher 114 3 15 .321 .368 .462 .831 .323 165

Dig that .463 BABIP for Reynolds. The three outcomes don't come much truer.

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San Diego Padres (Full table)
OPS: Mark McGwire (1.461)
tOPS+: Mark McGwire (191)

I was prepared to crown McGwire's line against San Diego as the biggest one-team demolition in baseball history. He got on base over half the time, and he hit 18 homers in 136 at-bats -- a 79-homer pace for 600 plate appearances.

But there was another.

Rk Player PA HR RBI BA OBP SLG OPS BAbip tOPS+
1 Mark McGwire 136 18 41 .389 .507 .954 1.461 .400 191
2 Davey Johnson 189 13 40 .333 .447 .641 1.087 .311 190
3 Rodney Scott 147 0 14 .347 .465 .415 .881 .402 188
4 Bill Sudakis 128 7 26 .328 .383 .586 .969 .337 172
5 Brian McRae 194 5 19 .351 .425 .556 .980 .382 169
6 Miguel Olivo 125 5 15 .336 .384 .534 .918 .395 168
7 Marc Hill 159 3 21 .321 .390 .414 .804 .331 163
8 Johnny Ray 289 4 31 .362 .415 .515 .930 .366 156
9 Luis Melendez 151 1 11 .336 .381 .401 .782 .363 154
10 Joe Pepitone 125 8 26 .333 .358 .579 .937 .294 153

Also, Miguel Olivo. Backup catcher of doom.

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San Francisco Giants (Full table)
OPS: Mark McGwire (1.199)
tOPS+: David Bell (185)

You can see why there's a loud contingent of people following NL teams who support McGwire for the Hall of Fame. For a few years, he was as fearsome as any hitter could possibly be.

Rk Player PA HR RBI BA OBP SLG OPS BAbip tOPS+
1 David Bell 166 7 29 .356 .430 .596 1.026 .375 185
2 Michael Tucker 132 8 25 .360 .443 .649 1.092 .363 184
3 Chris Iannetta 201 7 27 .338 .510 .586 1.096 .404 182
4 Hank Leiber 170 12 43 .366 .461 .683 1.144 .364 177
5 Mike Jorgensen 246 9 31 .338 .427 .529 .955 .365 165
6 Kevin Elster 171 8 22 .285 .359 .536 .895 .292 162
7 Lenny Randle 140 3 15 .328 .396 .456 .852 .328 159
8 Brian McRae 205 7 33 .342 .385 .558 .943 .377 157
9 Ron Swoboda 256 16 44 .284 .359 .555 .914 .302 157
10 Hal Morris 266 13 45 .357 .415 .601 1.016 .360 154

The Giants eventually acquired the first two players on the list. They were good at that.

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St. Louis Cardinals (Full table)
OPS: Jim Thome (1.575)
tOPS+: Jim Thome (223)

In the history of baseball, no player has punished a single team more than Jim Thome punished the Cardinals. He leads all hitters in OPS against a single team (min. 100 at-bats), and he also has the highest tOPS+. Even by the standards of a probable Hall of Famer, Thome saved his best work for the Cardinals.

Rk Player PA HR RBI BA OBP SLG OPS BAbip tOPS+
1 Jim Thome 131 18 40 .430 .565 1.010 1.575 .403 223
2 Ellis Burks 245 18 53 .378 .469 .794 1.264 .384 185
3 Terry Whitfield 169 10 20 .359 .413 .621 1.034 .363 183
4 Tom Saffell 113 4 16 .317 .361 .485 .846 .373 181
5 Angel Pagan 129 4 17 .361 .442 .565 1.007 .372 167
6 Lenny Randle 143 1 12 .339 .448 .424 .871 .379 166
7 Pete Whisenant 150 10 27 .284 .342 .575 .917 .286 165
8 Daryl Boston 135 4 12 .353 .422 .529 .952 .373 164
9 Thomas Howard 131 5 14 .302 .382 .543 .925 .323 164
10 Matt Holliday 120 9 15 .394 .475 .750 1.225 .395 163

Eighteen homers, 131 at-bats, and a .565 on-base percentage. He's a free agent, Cincinnati.

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Washington Nationals (Full table)
OPS: Jim Edmonds (1.198)
tOPS+: Chris Stynes (176)

This is the Expos' list too, don't forget. Apparently, Vernon Wells hit the Expos well in the cross-Canada interleague series.

Rk Player PA HR RBI BA OBP SLG OPS BAbip tOPS+
1 Chris Stynes 121 4 20 .363 .454 .559 1.013 .388 176
2 Art Shamsky 144 7 19 .333 .465 .561 1.027 .323 172
3 Biff Pocoroba 141 5 17 .328 .420 .504 .924 .330 168
4 Vernon Wells 125 11 21 .342 .400 .667 1.067 .333 167
5 Adam Jones 127 7 21 .383 .409 .625 1.034 .402 164
6 Danny Heep 199 5 24 .335 .412 .497 .909 .361 164
7 Jim Edmonds 189 16 53 .342 .455 .743 1.198 .375 162
8 Fernando Tatis 165 7 24 .333 .417 .623 1.040 .355 162
9 Sean Casey 226 6 48 .398 .469 .597 1.066 .402 161
10 Lee May 280 25 52 .311 .357 .650 1.007 .294 156

Amazing names on this list. Biff Pocoroba. Danny Heep. Art Shamsky. Weird note about Shamsky: He hit the Expos disproportionately well, but he was a career .185/.285/.252 hitter on turf. Not sure how that happened.

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