Michigan vs. Louisville: Trey Burke sits 14 minutes in first half

Kevin C. Cox

Trey Burke played in only six minutes in the first half of the biggest game of his life.

Michigan Wolverines star guard Trey Burke sat for 14 minutes in the first half of the 2013 NCAA Tournament championship game as a result of foul trouble.

For more on this game, head over to Card Chronicle and Maize n Brew.

Burke scored the first seven points for the Wolverines, but exited the game after six minutes of action upon being whistled for his second personal foul. Spike Albrecht stepped in and made four three-pointers en route to a 17-point half. Michigan extended its lead to as many as 12 points without Burke on the floor, but Louisville rallied back to take a 1-point advantage with 22 seconds left in the half.

Michigan reclaimed the lead with a pair of free throws from Glenn Robinson III two seconds before halftime.

Burke was the unanimous player of the year in college basketball, earning the Wooden, Naismith, Oscar Robinson and Associated Press awards.

More in College Basketball:

10 things to know about Michigan vs. Louisville

Pitino vs. Beilein: A contrast of styles

5 thoughts on Final Four Saturday

Spencer Hall: A field guide to Atlanta

Louisville, Michigan fans out in full force

Living and playing basketball with cancer

X
Log In Sign Up

forgot?
Log In Sign Up

Forgot password?

We'll email you a reset link.

If you signed up using a 3rd party account like Facebook or Twitter, please login with it instead.

Forgot password?

Try another email?

Almost done,

Join SBNation.com

You must be a member of SBNation.com to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at SBNation.com. You should read them.

Join SBNation.com

You must be a member of SBNation.com to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at SBNation.com. You should read them.

Spinner

Authenticating

Great!

Choose an available username to complete sign up.

In order to provide our users with a better overall experience, we ask for more information from Facebook when using it to login so that we can learn more about our audience and provide you with the best possible experience. We do not store specific user data and the sharing of it is not required to login with Facebook.