SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MARCH 29: Former Major League Baseball player Barry Bonds leaves federal court at the end of the day on March 29, 2011 in San Francisco, California. Barry Bonds' perjury trial accusing him of lying to a grand jury about his use of performance enhancing drugs when he played for the San Francisco Giants enters its second week. The trial is expected to last two to four weeks. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Barry Bonds Avoids Jail Time, Is Sentenced To Probation, House Arrest

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Barry Bonds Trial: Government Ego Consistent Through The End

The Barry Bonds trial and the ten year BALCO investigation more or less came to a close Friday afternoon as Judge Susan Illston sentenced Barry Bonds for his conviction on an obstruction of justice charge. There will be an appeal of the sentence, but for all intents and purposes, this long saga has come to an end.

Eight months after a jury found Bonds guilty of obstruction of justice and was deadlocked on three counts of perjury, the US government attorneys and Barry Bonds' attorneys convened one last time in Courtroom 10 of the Phillip Burton Federal Building in San Francisco. In a case that was marred by bickering between the two sides, it was fitting that there was one last contentious moment to close the trial.

Prior to this final hearing, the United States Probation Office submitted a pre-sentence report with an assessment of the facts of the case and a suggested sentence of 15-21 months probation with a short period of house arrest, community service and a fine. Both sides filed their own subsequent sentencing memoranda with their suggested sentence. Bonds' attorneys agreed with the pre-sentence report while the government attorneys asked for 15 months in prison.

Judge Susan Illston provided both sides with an opportunity to present a final statement as to the sentence before she made her ruling. Bonds' attorneys declined the opportunity, other than to request a chance for rebuttal if the government had a statement to make. And of course, the government had plenty to say.

Unfortunately, none of what the government said was particularly applicable. AUSA Matthew Parrella addressed Judge Illston and proceeded to discuss why the government believed Bonds deserved to spend time in prison. Their argument focused on the serious nature of his crime and the fact that he was not repentant. They specifically focused on the intentional nature of his crimes and the plotted-out nature of them.

Of course, the crime for which he was sentenced involved nothing related to intentional evasiveness or lying. He was cleared of the more intentional charges. Whether that makes him innocent or guilty in the eyes of the American public is besides the point, and Judge Illston specifically stated that. Whatever anybody thinks of Bonds in a baseball context or just as a human being had nothing to do with the sentence she was going to impose. She was imposing a sentence based on the charge for which he was convicted.

The government's insistence on rehashing irrelevant details followed the pattern of the entire trial in which they seemed to believe that if one says something enough, eventually it has to be true. Given that the BALCO investigation began a decade ago and the subsequent prosecutions have lasted over four years, it is not surprising that the government has acted they way that they have, even as the case comes to a close. A decade after Trevor Graham first made the USADA aware of "the clear" and the investigations began, it has all ended with a whimper.

At the end of the day, three people were convicted in the BALCO investigations and all three received nothing more than probation and modest amounts house arrest. Given the time and resources used, it is hard to imagine it was worth it. Aside from the defense attorneys being able to bill thousands of hours, it is difficult to see any real winners after the last decade.

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McCovey Chronicles: "Why We're Thrilled Barry Bonds Isn't Going To Jail"

Here’s what you get from a half crazy-eyed, half clear-thinking baseball fan who’s just seen one of his once-favorite players avoid a stint in the clink:

The default position of McCovey Chronicles is that you wouldn’t understand. You weren’t there when Bonds was doing amazing things. You weren’t there when the Giants played their first game of 1993 in San Francisco instead of Tampa, and they had the best player in baseball — a local kid with a family history that was completely intertwined with San Francisco Giants history. You weren’t there when he hit his 500th homer into the water against Terry Adams to beat the Dodgers. You weren’t there to see him hit any into the water after battling hypothermia and sludge mites at Candlestick, doing it at a new park that he was at least partially responsible for.

 

And when I use “you,” I mean heathen non-Giants fans. Those people. But Cardinals fans who still have an affinity for Mark McGwire can surely understand a little bit. Cubs fans who still remember Sammy Sosa fondly can understand. The repeated success of a player — with the player in question being wholly tied into the identity of your favorite team, which you’ve somehow tied into your own identity for some weird reason — toggles a bunch of switches in your brain. Those switches are hard to turn off. Some of them might be irreversible.

When I was in high school, one of my favorite players — along with a few of his teammates — was actually sent to prison for using drugs. I don’t recall cheering for him any less, upon his return.

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Barry Bonds Sentence: Home Run King Avoids Jail; Judge Orders House Arrest, Probation

Ten years after the BALCO investigation first began, it has come to a close with Barry Bonds' for his conviction of obstruction of justice. Bonds was sentenced to two years probation on Friday, which will include 30 days of location monitoring, also known as house arrest. During the 30 days, Bonds will be confined to his house except for the most basic of needs.

Additionally, Bonds was fined $4,000 and a $100 special assessment. Bonds' attorneys indicated they will appeal the sentence and requested the house arrest be stayed pending the appeal. The judge agreed and the appeal will be filed Friday.

The government attempted to argue that Bonds deserved some form of imprisonment and requested that he be required to acknowledge his guilt. They pointed to Marion Jones' prison sentence and other sentences, but those involved convictions on more serious charges. They pointed to Bonds lying, but that did not apply as the three perjury charges were dismissed. Accordingly, Judge Illston stuck with the presentence report that suggested probation and house arrest.

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Barry Bonds Trial: Sentencing Scheduled For Friday

The saga that has been the government prosecution of Major League Baseball home-run king Barry Bonds will come to a close on Friday, December 16, as Bonds will finally receive his sentence for obstruction of justice. Nearly a decade after the events that instigated the case, the BALCO steroids investigation will finally come to a close.

In April, Bonds was found guilty of obstruction of justice as it related to comments he made to the BALCO grand jury. His guilt was based on his rambling testimony nine years ago and has generated plenty of debate over the merits of the conviction. The Bonds case went to the jury on three counts of a false declaration (perjury) and one count of obstruction of justice. The jury was hung on the three counts of false declaration but found Bonds guilty of obstruction of justice. The jury voted 11-1 and 9-3 on two of the perjury charges, but even with that, the government elected not to pursue a new trial.

The United States Probation Office filed a pre-sentence report with the court and suggested a sentence of 15-21 months of probation with a monitoring device. This would equate to what is commonly known as "house arrest." This would also fall in line with the sentences Judge Illston has imposed in the prior BALCO cases over which she presided.

Bonds' attorneys filed a sentencing memorandum agreeing with the US Probation Office report, in large part due to the non-violent nature of the crime, Bonds' lack of a criminal history and his various charitable causes. The government filed their own memorandum in which they ask for 15 months of prison time.

The government's memo included a variety of arguments from their trial, which will likely not be considered by the judge. They pointed to a variety of issues from the trial that had nothing to do with the obstruction charge, including Bonds' alleged lies, for which he was found not guilty. It would be rather shocking if Bonds received any jail time. Instead, he will likely receive the low end of that 15-21 months of "house arrest."

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Barry Bonds Trial: Remaining 3 Counts Dismissed

The three remaining charges against Barry Bonds have been dropped.

U.S. Attorney Melinda Haag filed notice in federal court Wednesday that three counts of perjury against the former MLB slugger for making false statements to a grand jury were being dismissed.

Bonds was convicted in April of obstruction of justice for being evasive during his 2003 grand jury testimony in the BALCO steroids case.

He is scheduled to be sentenced December 16 on that charge after U.S. District Judge Susan Illston upheld the ruling last Friday, denying Bonds' request for a new trial.

The 12-member jury that convicted him on that count failed to reach a verdict on the three perjury charges, which alleged Bonds lied to the grand jury when he denied that he knowingly used steroids.

A mistrial was declared on those counts, which have now been dropped.

Bonds, as you might remember, is a seven-time MVP, eight-time Gold Glove winner, 14-time All-Star and two-time batting champion. He was very good.

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Barry Bonds Trial: Jury Voted 11-1 For Guilty Verdict On Perjury Charge

According to SB Nation Bay Area’s David Fucillo, there has been some explanation from some of the jurors in the Barry Bonds perjury trial:

On count two, which dealt with injections (of any substance) by anybody other than a Giants trainer or Bonds physicians, the jury voted 11-1 for a guilty verdict. The lone holdout felt that Kathy Hoskins was not sufficiently credible.

On count one the jury was voting 9-3 for acquittal. This count dealt with Bonds saying he wasn’t sure whether what he was taking was any kind of steroid. There’s no word on where the jury was as to count three.

There is no word as to whether the prosecution will seek to retry Bonds on the three counts that were declared a mistrial, though it’s possible that the lopsided (but not unanimous) jury vote on the second count might embolden such an effort.

The next hearing is scheduled for May 20.

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Barry Bonds Trial: Guilty Verdict Related To Answer About Syringe

With Barry Bonds found guilty on one count of obstruction of justice, and a mistrial declared on three other counts, the baseball and legal world exploded into a supernova of confusion. Sports Illustrated’s George Dohrmann was at the trial, and tweeted his first thought to the verdict:

Snap analysis: An odd verdict. Basically got Bonds for rambling and avoiding questions and maybe being less than truthful.

The specific charge that Bonds was found guilty of was Statement C of Count Five:

Question: Did Greg ever give you anything that required a syringe to inject yourself with?

Answer: I’ve only had one doctor touch me. And that’s my only personal doctor. Greg, like I said, we don’t get into each others’ personal lives. We’re friends, but I don’t – we don’t sit around and talk baseball, because he knows I don’t want – don’t come to my house talking baseball. If you want to come to my house and talk about fishing, some other stuff, we’ll be good friends. You come around talking about baseball, you go on. I don’t talk about his business. You know what I mean?

That statement is what the jury found to be obstructive enough for Bonds to be convicted, though there is no explanation yet as to why, if Bonds obstructed justice with that statement, that didn’t translate into a guilty verdict for one of the charges of perjury as well.

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Barry Bonds Trial Verdict: Jury Finds Bonds Guilty Of Obstruction Of Justice

And we have a resolution to the Barry Bonds trial, of sorts. After a confusing Wednesday afternoon in which we were told that a verdict had been reached, and then that a verdict had not been reached, it turned out that a partial verdict was reached, and the jury has found Bonds guilty of obstruction of justice.

In other words, Bonds was found guilty on count 5, while the jury was split on the others - those being the perjury counts. Bonds reportedly had a stoic response, and the jury was released back into the wild.

It's not yet clear what punishment Bonds will face, although Judge Illston has ordered house arrest in similar cases in the past. It's also not yet clear whether the prosecution will attempt to retry the case.

The defense is fighting the verdict, saying that Bonds was simply found guilty of rambling. The next hearing will be on May 20.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Verdict Reached, Not Reached, Kind Of Reached

It's been an interesting day in the Barry Bonds trial. After days of deliberation, an announcement came out that the jury had reached a verdict. This set a whole avalanche of things in motion, what with the end suddenly coming into view.

Then the court amended its statement and said a verdict had not been reached. Oh, the embarrassment!

And more, the jury then said that it had a verdict on one count, but not for the rest. The foreman said that further deliberation would be of no use. So after some discussion, the court has agreed to hear the verdict on the one count, and declare a mistrial on the rest, on account of a deadlock.

A mistrial, of course, meaning we may very well get to do this all over again. But at least we get to hear the one verdict!

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial: After Two Days Of Deliberation, Jury Still Hasn't Reached Verdict

In the Barry Bonds Trial, the closing arguments have been heard and the lawyer work is done. It’s all up to the jury now to deliberate and come to a verdict. For two days now, the jury has done plenty of deliberating. It’s the verdict part that’s been so tough for them.

After two full days of deliberations — more than 10 hours of debate — the jurors assigned to determine Barry Bonds’s fate came up empty again Monday and failed to render a verdict.

To help them possibly come to a decision, the panel of eight women and four men spent the morning hearing Kathy Hoskins’ testimony being read to them by a court reporter. Hoskins was the only person who said she saw Bonds being injected by Greg Anderson, his former trainer.

After the reading of the testimony, the jury went back to deliberate. And deliberate is exactly what they plan on doing until they return to court Tuesday morning.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial: Greg Anderson Ordered To Be Released From Jail

With the jury in the Barry Bonds trial deliberating, Judge Susan Illston has ordered the release of Bonds' former trainer, and professional obstructer-of-justice, Greg Anderson. This, according to the New York Daily News:

BREAKING NEWS: Barry Bonds' judge orders Greg Anderson released from prison ... more to come

Anderson was first locked up for refusing to testify before a Federal grand jury in 2006, claiming that the subpoena to testify violated a plea bargain agreement in the BALCO case. Since then, Anderson has been in and out of prison for refusing to help the government's case. His latest incarceration began March 22, when Bonds' perjury trial began.

Much of the government's case rested on secret recordings of Anderson and Bonds' former friend and assistant, Steve Hoskins, but Anderson's refusal to corroborate the validity of the tapes weakened the prosecution's efforts.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial: Jury Sent Into Deliberations

We're almost there! We're so close you guys!

The Barry Bonds trial has now advanced to pretty much the final stage - jury deliberations, as the closing arguments have been heard. The lawyer work is done.

Earlier, we left off with Bonds defense lawyer Allen Ruby on the floor. After lunch, Cris Arguedas took over for Ruby, and asked the jury whether the prosecution had proven its case beyond a reasonable doubt. She undermined the testimony of Steve Hoskins, she accused the government of flying by the seat of its pants, and declared the prosecution had done nothing with regard to proving the side effects of steroid use.

Later, she presented evidence that Bonds' testicles were "normal" every time he had a physical exam, and then set about undermining Kathy Hoskins, who was a key witness. She finished by blasting Kimberly Bell before turning things back over to Ruby, who wrapped things up by asserting that the government had bad witnesses and did a shoddy job of establishing proof.

Matt Parrella was then given an opportunity to give a final rebuttal, and he insisted that the government's witnesses were solid, and that Stan Conte's testimony, along with the tape of a conversation between Steve Hoskins and Greg Anderson, established proof that Bonds was using and knew exactly what was going on. He concluded by saying that the defense's argument is "impossible to believe."

And that was it. That was all of the legal speaking. The jury then went off to deliberate, and we're only a matter of time away from finding out how this whole things ends up.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Hears Closing Arguments On Thursday

The Barry Bonds trial is just about in the hands of the jury, now. All that was left for them to do before beginning deliberation was hearing the closing arguments from both sides, which are being presented on Thursday.

The prosecution went first, with Jeff Nedrow handling the duties. Nedrow began by saying that all Bonds had to do was tell the truth to the grand jury, which the prosecution alleges he did not. Nedrow set about discussing the testimony of the government's witnesses, highlighting the implausibility of a player like Bonds not knowing what he was putting in his body. He also talked about Greg Anderson being a known steroid dealer, and pointed to the testimony of former players who took substances given to them by Anderson, understanding them to be undetectable steroids.

Additionally, Nedrow underscored that Kathy Hoskins claims to have witnessed Anderson injecting Bonds in the stomach with HGH. He closed by saying that "common sense" would lead the jury to finding Bonds guilty of his crimes.

The floor was then turned over to Bonds defense lawyer Allen Ruby, who immediately argued that the government had failed to present any meaningful proof of anything. He said that Bonds answered every question in his grand jury testimony truthfully, and that there's no proof otherwise. Ruby also used Bonds' positive THG test as evidence of innocence, as THG was barely understood for a few years after Bonds began using and wasn't detected in Bonds' 2003 urine sample until 2006.

On top of that, Ruby argued that the government failed to prove that Bonds' grand jury testimony was material to the investigation, which the jury must consider true if it is to find Bonds guilty of perjury.

That's where we stand now, with Ruby in the middle of his closing argument. After this, prosecutor Matt Parrella will present the final rebuttal, and then it'll be up to the jury to decide how this goes.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial: Defense Rests, Closing Arguments Upcoming

Wednesday has turned out to be an easy day in the Barry Bonds trial, because it's already over! After suggesting they might call Steve Hoskins and even Barry Bonds himself, the defense wound up resting without calling a single witness.

There were some other legal matters that got taken care of. For one thing, the prosecution dropped one of its four perjury counts against Bonds, pertaining to allegations that Bonds lied about using the cream and the clear prior to 2003. The defense had argued that the prosecution didn't present sufficient evidence, and so the government has dropped it altogether rather than try to argue otherwise. Bonds now faces three counts of perjury and one count of obstruction of justice.

Meanwhile, judge Illston has denied the defense's attempt to strike the testimony of former players, along with its attempt to strike testimony having to do with steroids and their possible side effects.

So we move on to Thursday's closing arguments. It's estimated that the prosecution will argue for around 1.5 hours, while the defense will argue for three hours. It's only a matter of time now before the jury gets to begin deliberation.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Nears End As Prosecution Rests Case

Earlier on Tuesday in the Barry Bonds trial, judge Illston ruled that Steve Hoskins' tape of a recorded conversation between himself and Dr. Arthur Thing was inadmissible as evidence. That was a big break for the defense.

After that, the courtroom read Bonds' grand jury testimony aloud. Once that was concluded, the prosecution rested its case and turned things over to the defense. At that point, the jurors were sent home for the day so that the various lawyers could talk about lawyery things.

The defense filed a motion to clear Bonds of all charges, but that wasn't about to happen, so they also attempted to focus on a few individual things. Judge Illston says she's probably going to strike evidence pertaining to steroid use and Bonds' testicles. She's also willing to consider dropping one of the four perjury charges against Bonds, although that hasn't been decided yet.

The trial will resume on Wednesday, when the defense will present its case and in so doing may recall Steve Hoskins. Judge Illston intends for closing arguments to be heard on Thursday.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Proceeds To Grand Jury Testimony As New Tape Ruled Inadmissible

After a Monday hiccup, the Barry Bonds trial is back on Tuesday morning, which is good news for all of us, since moving forward is the only way to reach the end.

Some lab workers have been called to testify about how Bonds' urine sample was handled during the testing process in 2006. This was the sample that tested positive for THG, or "the clear". It was also a sample that tested positive for clomid, which is used as a masking agent. This is an important point. It would be difficult for Bonds' team to argue the slugger didn't know what he was taking if he was also taking a masking agent. The positive clomid result hasn't yet been admitted as evidence, but the judge says that it probably will be soon, and at that point it will be up to the defense to argue that the test wasn't up to the stands of the scientific community. Bonds' sample was only tested once, where it's normal protocol for a positive result to be confirmed with a second test.

Now then, on to the really spicy stuff - the suddenly-discovered tape of a recorded conversation between Steve Hoskins and Dr. Arthur Ting. Hoskins, remember, testified that he and Ting spoke about Bonds and steroids 50 times. Ting then testified that no such conversations ever took place. The recorded conversation is muddled, but there are several references to "Barry", seemingly substantiating Hoskins' testimony.

A transcript of the tape was submitted by the prosecution, but in the end, the judge ruled it inadmissible, saying it was "barely intelligible" and littered with issues. This is a pretty big win for the defense, which had been caught off guard by the discovery. The prosecution can show that a conversation between Hoskins and Ting was recorded, but they cannot discuss what was said.

As of this writing, Bonds' grand jury testimony is being read aloud in the courtroom. It is this grand jury testimony in which the prosecution alleges Bonds lied, so this is really the heart of the whole thing.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Delayed As Juror Out With Illness

On Monday, we thought we'd pick up where we left off in the Barry Bonds trial with anti-doping expert Don Catlin on the stand as the prosecution's final witness. However! A wrench has been thrown into the mix - one juror is out with kidney stones (or gall stones, or something). They keep alternate jurors around for situations such as this, but the court has evidently decided to more or less just take the day off and re-evaluate the situation on Tuesday. The lawyers didn't want to replace the missing juror with one of the backups.

But that doesn't mean we don't have a little news. For one thing, judge Illston is considering a defense motion to review whether or not the prosecution failed to turn over some relevant evidence (such as the fact that Kimberly Bell kept two separate diaries). And for another thing, witness Steve Hoskins has apparently located a tape on which he recorded a conversation between himself and Dr. Arthur Ting. You'll recall that Ting contradicted Hoskins' testimony that he had about 50 conversations with Ting about Bonds and steroids, saying no such conversations ever took place. But Hoskins now claims to have proof that the two spoke about the subject matter at least once. Hoskins had said earlier that he had a tape but couldn't find it. Now, it seems, he's found it.

Naturally, Bonds' defense team is suspicious of the timing, and as of this very writing the prosecution and defense lawyers are arguing about how to proceed. Stay tuned!

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial: Witness Saw Greg Anderson Inject Bonds

The Barry Bonds trial has again gone dark for the week, and will reconvene next Monday morning. But Thursday was not without its intrigue.

Earlier, Dr. Arthur Ting's testimony destroyed previous testimony by Steve Hoskins, as Bonds' former orthopedic surgeon said he only spoke once with Hoskins, and didn't provide any information on steroids to take back to the player. That was a big win for the defense.

But up next was Kathy Hoskins, Bonds' former personal shopper, and Hoskins testified that she once observed Greg Anderson inject Bonds with a substance. The defense tried to argue that Hoskins and her brother were in cahoots to take Bonds down, but Hoskins stuck to her story. The reason this is important is that one of the perjury charges against Bonds is that he denied ever being injected by anyone other than his personal doctor, and Anderson wasn't his personal doctor. It doesn't matter what was being injected (and Hoskins didn't know for sure); all that matters is whether the injection took place.

After Kathy Hoskins left the stand, the government called anti-doping expert Don Catlin. Catlin spoke about the drug testing process, and how difficult it was back in the day to detect THG. Court has adjourned with Catlin still on the stand, so he'll return on Monday morning.

Catlin is the government's final witness. After he's done, Bonds' grand jury testimony will be read aloud. After that, we'll see what the defense has in store, and after that, it's time for closing statements. We could reach closing statements as soon as Tuesday.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Hears From Arthur Ting, Kathy Hoskins

Back with more from the Barry Bonds trial! Who cares about Opening Day, anyway?

On the trial's last day this week - remember that the courtroom is dark on Friday - the government has so far called Dr. Arthur Thing and Kathy Hoskins to the stand. Ting is Bonds' former orthopedic surgeon, and Hoskins is Bonds' former personal shopper, and sister of witness Steve Hoskins.

Ting, it turned out, wound up being an excellent witness for the defense, as he tore apart the earlier testimony from Steve Hoskins. Hoskins testified that he talked to Ting about steroids around 50 times, and that he asked for some relevant literature to take back to Bonds. Ting said that they talked once, and never about Bonds and steroids. Ting also testified that Bonds was afraid of needles, and that he had another trainer - Harvey Shields - who liked to use flaxseed oil.

Additionally, Ting recalled prescribing corticosteroids to Bonds for purposes of rehabilitation. Corticosteroids are legal and commonly used, and they happen to share many of the same side effects as regular steroids. Bonds' defense lawyer took care to point this out.

Ting was a great help to Bonds, and after he was dismissed, judge Illston questioned whether the prosecution knew beforehand that Hoskins and Ting would share such different testimony. The prosecution didn't come out of this looking good.

Next to the stand was Kathy Hoskins, who the government hoped would work a little more in their favor. After discussing her history with Bonds, Hoskins got to the meat of the matter, saying that Greg Anderson was always hanging around Bonds, and that one time in 2002 she observed Anderson inject Bonds in the belly button. Upon cross-examination, Cris Arguedas is attempting to suggest that Kathy and her brother Steve have been working together to bring Bonds down, but Kathy has insisted that Steve actually "threw [her] under the bus" and caused her to have to testify.

That's where we are now, with Hoskins still on the stand. Worth noting:

A lot of buzz here during the recess. Consensus: This trial is over. Bonds is gonna walk.less than a minute ago via web

Stay tuned. Recall that Bonds is facing five different charges. But he's had a good morning.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Nearing End Of Government Witness List

On we go with the Barry Bonds trial. But I have good news! The thing may only go on a little while longer, as the prosecution has pared down its witness list.

Earlier today, we left off with a laboratory worker on the stand. The government called a few more lab workers as witnesses in the afternoon, establishing that Bonds' urine sample was handled appropriately from start to finish. The prosecution then informed the jury that Bonds' sample tested positive for THG, to which Bonds had previously admitted. The issue isn't that he tested positive; it's that he allegedly didn't know what substances he was taking at the time.

With the lab stuff out of the way, the prosecution only has so much left. Thursday morning, Bonds' grand jury testimony will be read aloud. After that, the government will call but three more witnesses - Bonds' former personal shopper Kathy Hoskins, Bonds' former orthopedic surgeon Dr. Arthur Ting, and anti-doping expert Don Catlin. The government is finished calling former players, trimming its initial list of witnesses.

So we're making real progress. We'll see what the defense chooses to do, but we may not be far away from closing arguments.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Hones In On Drug Testing Procedure On Wednesday

The Barry Bonds trial continues on, and while you and I may be running out of steam, we've still got a couple weeks to go. Here's to justice!

Tuesday's action ended with former Giants player Marvin Benard on the stand, so he returned for cross-examination on Wednesday morning. Benard had said that Greg Anderson told him he was providing an "undetectable steroid," but Bonds' lawyer Allen Ruby questioned whether Anderson had used those specific words. Ruby's trying to establish that players may not have known exactly what they were being given.

Up next was former player Randy Velarde, who testified about meeting Anderson and receiving injections, but never being specifically told about the "cream" and the "clear".

That was it for the players - at least for the time being - so we advanced to IRS agents and laboratory workers, called to explain in detail how a sample is obtained and then tested. Ruby lashed into one agent, Mike Wilson, for failing to explain in detail how samples being used as evidence are handled, but outside of that, it's all been pretty dull. The prosecution is just using these witnesses to show that Bonds' seized urine sample was handled appropriately, and that there aren't any questions about the reason it tested positive for THG and clomid (used by some athletes to mask steroid side effects) in 2006.

Onward we go. Lots of talk about testing urine samples. Because prosecutors aren't able to use urine samples from earlier years that allegedly showed Bonds as testing positive, this is actually pretty important.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Features Jeremy, Jason Giambi On Busy Tuesday

In discussing the Barry Bonds trial earlier Tuesday, we left off with former Giants trainer Stan Conte. So let's pick up!

Bonds' defense team began its cross-examination of Conte in earnest after lunch, and took time to focus on his split with Bonds, during which Conte told Bonds he should look elsewhere for his rehab. Allen Ruby also showed Conte a letter from Bonds' doctor written in late 2003 that said the player was in great health.

At that point, Conte's stint was done, and the government called Jason Giambi, the first of a few baseball players who will serve as witnesses. Giambi testified that he met Greg Anderson in Japan in 2002 and soon thereafter started visiting Balco. Giambi was already using a steroid, but it was detectable, so Anderson gave him some stuff that tests wouldn't pick up. Giambi received, in different shipments, testosterone, syringes, calendars, the "cream", the "clear", and usage instructions, and said he understood the substances to be steroid-like performance enhancers. The defense attempted to establish in cross-examination that Giambi didn't know what the cream and the clear were back in 2002 and 2003.

Up next was Jason's brother Jeremy Giambi, who also met Anderson in Japan. After a few conversations, Anderson told Giambi that he could provide undetectable performance-enhancing drugs. Before long, Giambi received a package containing the cream, the clear, and HGH. The defense again tried to suggest that Giambi didn't have a good understanding of what these substances were, but Giambi said he understood them to be steroid-like.

Our final witness of the day was Bonds' former teammate Marvin Benard. Benard testified that, after trying some steroids in Mexico, he talked with Anderson, who said he could provide some better stuff. Benard then said that Anderson personally injected him, and that he began using the cream and the clear. He also testified to using HGH at Anderson's suggestion. It's worth noting that he didn't personally observe other teammates in the clubhouse using steroids. Bonds' name didn't come up.

The day ended before Benard could be subjected to cross-examination, so he'll return Wednesday morning. And so will we!

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Hears From Stan Conte, Others On Tuesday

Nothing but non-stop excitement in the Barry Bonds trial. Bonds' former mistress Kimberly Bell was dismissed from the stand on Monday, but by no means did that mark the end of the fun.

The first witness called to the stand Tuesday morning was Barry Sample, an expert in drug testing. Sample wasn't up there long, and spoke about how MLB's drug testing program was carried out in 2003. It was noted that a Bonds urine sample didn't test positive for anything in 2003, but did test positive for THG when re-tested by another lab at a later date.

Up next was Dale Kennedy, whose job it was to personally obtain urine samples from Major League Baseball players. That means exactly what you think it means, and Bonds' team didn't even bother with a cross-examination.

And that brought us to former Giants trainer Stan Conte. Conte was uncomfortable with Bonds' relationship with personal trainer Greg Anderson and saw them together regularly. Conte also testified that Bonds started growing far more muscular around 1999, with concurrent development of acne. Later, Conte recalled a conversation he had with Bonds in 2003 about steroids after the government raid of Balco and Anderson's house. Conte said he told Bonds he thought steroid use was unfair, while Bonds' reply suggested he didn't think it was a big deal.

Conte closed out by saying he and Bonds had a strained relationship that eventually broke down, and that Bonds didn't follow Conte's rehab program after knee surgery in 2005. At no point did Conte testify that he observed Bonds using performance enhancers. Conte is now being subjected to cross-examination as we speak.

So that's where we stand. You should also note that the defense team has argued that the government failed to turn over some relevant materials, which judge Illston is taking into consideration. Illston may have the jury ignore testimony from Kimberly Bell pertaining to Bonds' testicle size due to inconsistencies and admitted exaggerations. Bonds' testicles. Barry Bonds' testicles. Everybody think about Barry Bonds' testicles.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Hears Further Kimberly Bell Testimony

The Barry Bonds trial resumed on Monday morning by calling former Bonds mistress Kimberly Bell to the stand. The early part of the morning was spent with Bell explaining the history of her relationship with Bonds, and discussing various changes she observed in him both phsically and psychologically.

Bell was then subjected to cross-examination from Cristina Aguedas, and this grew to be borderline hostile, as Arguedas set about attempting to undermine the witness and paint her as a bitter, jealous ex. Arguedas attacked Bell's motives for trying to write a book about Bonds before the lunch break, and when the trial resumed, Arguedas hardly missed a beat, continuing to pound away. Arguedas suggested that Bell grew increasingly resentful over the course of the relationship as Bonds got married to another woman and pushed Bell to the side.

Arguedas concluded by getting Bell to admit that some statements she made to Playboy and the grand jury about changes to Bonds' sexual organs were overblown. That brought prosecutor Jeff Nedrow back out for further questioning of Bell. Nedrow's first order of business was to establish that Bell did not make up the fact that Bonds told her about steroid use in 1999-2000.

After a little more questioning, Bell was finally finished and released, and that just about wrapped up the day. Coming up will be former Giants trainer Stan Conte and Kathy Hoskins - Bonds' former personal shopper - to be followed by Randy Velarde and the Giambi brothers.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Resumes, Welcomes Kimberly Bell To Stand

We're back! We're back to the Barry Bonds trial, everybody! After a long weekend, the trial picked up where it left off on Monday morning, and now we're getting to the good stuff, by which I mean the stuff that nobody wants to hear about ever.

First, long-time Giants equipment manager Mike Murphy took the stand and nervously testified that Bonds' hat size increased by a small amount around 2002, which the government wants to pin on the use of HGH. Bonds' attorney Allen Ruby asserted that a bigger size could've had to do with simple aging and weight gain.

Murphy wasn't up there long, and then came former Bonds mistress Kimberly Bell, here to testify about Bonds' physical and personality changes over the course of their nine-year relationship. After talking about the relationship's origin, Bell testified that Bonds talked to her about using steroids around 1999-2000. Then she started detailing changes to his physical appearance around the same time. Back acne, balding, bloating, sexual dysfunction. She also touched on increased irritability and aggression, which the government blames on supposed "roid rage".

Bell said that the relationship ended in 2003, at which point she found herself in financial trouble. Not long after that, the cross-examination began, and Bonds' lawyer Cristina Arguedas immediately set about questioning Bell's history and motives. She hit on how often Bell discussed her ex-mistress status on radio. She painted her as a bitter ex looking to capitalize on Bonds' situation, and noted how she attempted to write a tell-all book about her relationship with the star.

After a break, the cross-examination resumed, and Arguedas continued insisting that Bell was angry at Bonds after their split. She spent a lot of time talking about her attempted book and questioned Bell about her intent in writing it. She denied that she wrote it to get rich and she denied that she wanted it to be about steroids and baseball, but Arguedas wouldn't let up. She has spent his morning trying to undermine her credibility, and the dialogue has grown heated.

That's where we stand now, during the courtroom lunch break. Things'll pick back up again shortly.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Excuses Anti-Doping Expert, Finishes First Week

The Barry Bonds trial wrapped up its first week of courtroom activity on Thursday afternoon. Last time we left you, anti-doping expert Larry Bowers was on the stand, and on Thursday afternoon he was subjected to cross-examination.

Allen Ruby came right after Bowers, asking for scientific proof that performance enhancers cause the sorts of side effects he discussed in the morning. Bowers had suggested that steroids and HGH can cause changes like roid rage, bigger heads, and shrunken testicles, and Ruby asked if there was any evidence beyond warnings and suggestions. Bowers repeatedly responded that the limited literature is the result of the fact that humans can't be experimented on, and that several symptoms of use have been anecdotally reported to be common.

Ruby focused primarily on arguing that no direct link can be drawn between performance enhancers and their alleged side effects. Breaking from that for a little, he also argued that doping agencies weren't aware of THG - "the clear", one of the steroids linked to Bonds - until well after Bonds' grand jury testimony, suggesting that few people really understood what it was and that Bonds therefore could have been telling the truth when he said he didn't know what he was taking when he was taking it.

Ruby wrapped up his cross-examination by asking Bowers a few more questions about shrunken testicles, and then Bowers was set free. And that'll do it for the week, as the courtroom is dark on Fridays. On Monday, the government will call a bunch of agents and presumably Bonds' former mistress Kimberly Bell. Bell will be asked to discuss Bonds' sexual performance.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Focuses On Anti-Doping Expert On Day Four

The Barry Bonds trial picked up Thursday morning where it left off Wednesday afternoon, with Bonds' former assistant Steve Hoskins on the stand undergoing cross-examination. Bonds' lawyer spent much of his time focusing on notes from Hoskins' interview with federal agents back in 2005, and pointing out various inconsistencies between what he said then and what he's said since. Hoskins seems to have initially embellished the facts of what he knew, claiming, among other things, that his sister personally saw Bonds get injected by Greg Anderson.

Ruby also made a few other attempts to discredit the government's witness, alleging that Hoskins and Kimberly Bell - another government witness, and a former mistress of Bonds' - have a close and comfortable relationship.

Eventually, the questions were finished and Hoskins was allowed to leave the stand, although the defense asked for the right to recall him if need be. The government then called anti-doping expert Larry Bowers. Bowers is in the courtroom to talk about the development of performance enhancers and the various side-effects of steroid use. The government intends to build off his testimony by later establishing that witnesses observed many of these side-effects in Bonds over the years. These side effects include foot growth, head growth, and back acne.

That's where we are right now in the middle of the day. The defense should get its opportunity to question Bowers sometime this afternoon.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Focuses On Steve Hoskins On Wednesday

The Barry Bonds trial continued on Wednesday, and after Jeff Novitzky was dismissed, Bonds friend and assistant Steve Hoskins was called to the stand. That's where he remained at the end of the day, and that's where he'll return on Thursday morning.

Much of the morning was devoted to establishing Hoskins' history with Bonds, and explaining why - in detail - he wound up recording a conversation between himself and Greg Anderson. The tape of that conversation was admitted, and a section of it was played by the prosecution just after lunch. In the muffled tape, Bonds is only specifically mentioned once, but Anderson discusses the injection procedure, and the nature of the substances he'd inject.

Allen Ruby then stepped up to cross-examine the witness, and he spent the afternoon trying to discredit Hoskins. Hoskins and Bonds had a falling out back in 2003 over some dubious business deals, and Ruby suggested that Hoskins was out for revenge. He painted the tape as an attempt at extortion and showed how difficult it is to understand by playing another section, and additionally argued that Hoskins cut a deal with the government to testify against Bonds in exchange for immunity from charges Bonds was filing (for counterfeit merchandise). He also called into question the date of the recording, and highlighted some inconsistencies between Hoskins' testimony on Wednesday and what he told federal agents in a 2005 interview.

That was about the bulk of what happened on Wednesday, and Hoskins will return to the stand for further cross-examination on Thursday morning. It is worth noting that Hoskins insisted he's still fond of Bonds, and was only looking out for the player's best interests. Ruby and the defense clearly don't want the jury to believe him.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Continues Wednesday With Steve Hoskins

The Barry Bonds trial wrapped up its Tuesday with Jeff Novitzky on the stand, so he returned on Wednesday morning for cross-examination. The actual cross-examination didn't go on for too long, with Bonds lawyer Allen Ruby arguing that the government didn't release notes from its interviews with key witnesses so that their testimony could be verified. Ruby also took this opportunity to question a tape recording of a conversation between Bonds trainer Greg Anderson and Bonds friend/assistant Steve Hoskins. Ruby argued that the government cut Hoskins a deal to get him to testify against Bonds (by dropping a case Bonds had filed against Hoskins for forged memorabilia), and also that the transcript of the recorded conversation has been altered. The conversation will be a key part of the trial, so Ruby knows he has to question its integrity.

Next to the stand was long-time friend of Bonds, Steve Hoskins. Hoskins spent a lot of time detailing his history with Bonds, explaining how the two developed a close relationship. Hoskins handled Bonds' money, paying off mistresses, and he testified that he did distribute some money to Greg Anderson. He also testified - in a bit of a surprise - that he became aware of Bonds' steroid use in 1999. He said Bonds asked him to discuss one particular steroid with his personal orthopedic surgeon, Arthur Ting.

Hoskins continued, touching on how Bonds would complain that steroid injections made his "butt sore". Hoskins never personally saw Bonds get injected, but he saw him together with Anderson all the time and once saw Anderson enter a bedroom with Bonds and then leave holding a syringe. He also said that Anderson once told him that Bonds was using human growth hormone. Hoskins testified to changes in Bonds' appearance - specifically shoe size.

Eventually, Hoskins figured that Bonds' steroid use was "getting out of hand", so he conspired to tape the conversation between himself and Anderson to prove to Bonds' father, Bobby, what was going on with his son.

That's just about where we are now. Allen Ruby has not yet had an opportunity to really dig in against Hoskins in cross-examination. Judge Illston is currently trying to decide whether or not the Hoskins/Anderson tape will be admissible. The defense argues that it's hearsay, and the government can ill afford to lose it, as it's a key part of their case. Speculation is that it'll be admitted, but that Ruby will make the government work for it.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Concludes Tuesday With Jeff Novitzky On Stand

On Tuesday morning, after the jury was sworn in, the Barry Bonds trial kicked off with opening statements. Once those were complete, it was time to move on to witnesses. The prosecution called personal trainer Greg Anderson, but he refused to testify and was returned to custody. That brought Jeff Novitzky to the stand.

Novitzky was the government's lead investigator in the Balco case. He spent the first while on the stand discussing the investigation and how evidence was collected and all that. It was at least half an hour before he so much as mentioned Barry Bonds' name, and even after that, Bonds was more of an afterthought than a central character. The focus was more on what Balco was doing, and how Bonds seemed to have a relationship with Greg Anderson and Victor Conte.

So, there was a lot of talk about what Novitzky seized during the investigation. Novitzky also mentioned that, because of his connection, Bonds - along with about 30 other athletes - was called to testify to the Balco grand jury, and was given immunity. Novitzky said all the athletes were told the same thing: "The only thing you need to do is go in there and tell the truth."

The direct questioning concluded with Novitzky saying he found inconsistencies with the facts in Bonds' testimony. That took us to the cross-examination, where Allen Ruby tried to discredit one of the government's upcoming key witnesses. Novitzky wasn't very cooperative, and Ruby reportedly grew somewhat frustrated, but the court adjourned with Novitzky still on the stand so we'll get back to all this in the morning.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Progresses Past Opening Statements

On Monday, the 12-person jury was selected somewhat ahead of schedule for the Barry Bonds trial, meaning that, on Tuesday, the trial could begin in earnest. And the first order of business on Tuesday, after the jurors were sworn in and given their instructions, was for each side to give its opening statement.

The government went first, taking the floor for about 45 minutes. Federal prosecutor Matt Parrella began by discussing the history of the Balco investigation, and the seriousness of the company's deeds. He then went on to describe Bonds as being a "walking billboard" for the organization, having close personal relationships with head Victor Conte and personal trainer Greg Anderson.

From there, Parrella discussed some of Balco's products and some of the corresponding symptoms of use, and explained his intent to prove that Bonds is guilty of all five crimes with which he's been charged. He highlighted his key witnesses and notably delivered the line, "all he had to do was tell the truth," referring to Bonds' grand jury testimony. Parrella, of course, asserts that Bonds did not tell the truth, which is the whole reason we're doing this.

After Parrella was out of words, Bonds' defense lawyer Allen Ruby took over and explained that Bonds' testimony was truthful, and has been misinterpreted and taken out of context. Ruby said that no one was familiar with what "the cream" actually was - recall that Bonds testified that he didn't know he was taking performance enhancers - and seemed to focus on how difficult it is to prove that Bonds knew what he was using. Beyond that, Ruby then explained his intent to discredit the government's key witnesses, seemingly by showing that many of them hold a grudge. Before closing, Ruby also noted that the testimony of the government's witnesses won't have much to do with the actual charges Bonds is facing anyway.

So now the opening statements are all finished. Greg Anderson was then called as a witness, but, as expected, Anderson refused to testify. Judge Illston has ordered that he be taken into custody for the remainder of the trial unless he changes his mind. Next on the witness list will be Jeff Novitzky.

And we're off and running.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Jury Selected; Opening Statements To Come Tuesday

The Barry Bonds trial arrived in its San Francisco courtroom on Monday morning, and the first order of business was selecting a jury. It was expected that this voir dire process would run into Tuesday, but in something of a surprise, the whole process has been completed in a timely fashion. The numbers:

-eight women (two black) (six young)
-four men (all white) (all older)

So with that out of the way, the trial is set to proceed. Tuesday morning, after the jury is sworn in, each side will give its opening statement. The government has requested a block of one hour, while the defense has requested a block of one to two hours. Trainer Greg Anderson is scheduled to appear after the statements, but it's expected that he will refuse to testify, in which case Jeff Novitzky will be called as the government's first official witness.

Follow along in this StoryStream for updates, and also get more information from SB Nation Bay Area's Barry Bonds trial coverage, for which David Fucillo will be live-blogging - and live-tweeting - from the courtroom. You can follow on Twitter @SBNBayArea.

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Barry Bonds Trial Kicks Off Monday With Jury Selection

After so many months spent figuring out what is and isn't admissible, on Monday the Barry Bonds trial officially hit the San Francisco courtroom with the beginning of the jury selection process. It's expected that voir dire will take multiple days, after which the trial can begin in earnest.

The entire trial is projected to last between three and four weeks. Bonds is facing four charges of perjury and one charge of obstruction of justice, all stemming from grand jury testimony he gave in 2003 concerning his history with BALCO. The prosecution - which is the government, as the case's official name is USA v. Barry Bonds - asserts that Bonds lied when he denied knowingly being given or administered performance-enhancing drugs by trainer Greg Anderson. And while we've literally been talking about this case for a few years, now we can finally start making some actual progress, either towards justice or towards putting this all behind us, depending on your perspective.

A number of witnesses will be called during the course of the trial, but among them will be former baseball players including Benito Santiago, Jason Giambi, and Armando Rios. Anderson will be called, but he's expected to refuse to testify. He's currently in jail serving a sentence for refusing to testify to the grand jury.

Be sure to stay tuned to this StoryStream for updates as the trial progresses. And for even more depth, check out SB Nation Bay Area, where David Fucillo will be attending and blogging from the courtroom. You can find him tweeting at @SBNBayArea.

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