2013 MLB Draft results: Friday's Third round

Bruce Thorson-US PRESSWIRE

A brief scouting report on each player taken in the third round of the 2013 MLB Amateur Draft.

No. 74: Kent Emanuel, Houston Astros

Johnathon Mayo, MLB.com

His fastball will top out at around 91 mph, his breaking stuff is fringy and he has a solid changeup. But what he lacks in pure stuff he makes up for with pitchability. He has excellent command and knows how to mix his pitches extremely well.

No. 75: Jacob Hannemann, Chicago Cubs

Baseball America

He is a well above-average runner and has some work to do defensively, but he has the tools and instincts to stay in center field, though his arm grades out at the bottom of the scouting scale. A lefthanded hitter, he has a compact swing with natural strength.

No 76: Ivan Wilson, New York Mets

Keith Law, ESPN

Wilson is strong and well-built at 6-foot-3, 220 pounds with good bat speed but a deep load that bars his lead arm and creates excessive length, meaning he can't always get to the potentially plus power from his wrist strength and big hip rotation.

No 77: Sam Moll, Colorado Rockies

Baseball America

He sat at 94-95 mph in the Cape Cod League last summer, and he consistently hit 93-95 as a starter this spring. He has missed more bats this spring by staying down in the zone and throwing his short, power curveball for strikes more often.

No 78: Stuart Turner, Minnesota Twins

Keith Law, ESPN

As a receiver, Turner has outstanding hands, receiving smoothly without moving the glove, and a plus arm that has helped him nail half of opposing basestealers this year

No 79: Dace Kime, Chicago Cubs:

MLB.com

His fastball sits in the low- to mid-90s and he mixes it with a curveball, cutter and changeup. Kime uses his 6-foot-5, 219-pound frame to get a good downhill angle and creates a lot of groundballs as a result.

No 80: Ben Duluzio, Miami Marlins

MLB.com

At the plate, he makes consistent contact with a slashing, line-drive swing. Listed at 6-foot-2, 185 pounds, DeLuzio is strong and has surprising pop.

No 81: Jon Denney, Boston Red Sox

Johnathon Mayo, MLB.com

Denney has the complete package for the position, with advanced receiving skills and a plus arm. He has some power in his bat as well and showed off his offensive skills at the Area Code Games over the summer.

No 82: Carter Hope, Kansas City Royals

Baseball America

He's reminiscent of his brother Mason, who signed with the Marlins as a 2011 fifth-round pick out of an Oklahoma high school. His breaking ball isn't as advanced as Mason's was at the same stage, but Carter has added power to his curveball this spring.

No 83: Patrick Murphy, Toronto Blue Jays

J.J. Cooper, Baseball America

The Blue Jays took a high school pitcher who has already endured rehab.

No 84: Casey Meisner, New York Mets

Keith Law, ESPN

Meisner is a super-projectable right-hander with a great 6-foot-7 frame and lots of room to fill out, but who already flashes plus velocity with a delivery that has more effort than you'd like to see.

No 85: Tyler O'Neil, Seattle Mariners

MLB.com

At 6-feet, 200 pounds, he is solidly built and earned the nickname Tank. He is an aggressive hitter and should develop good power.

No 86: Bryan Verbitsky, San Diego Padres

MLB.com

His fastball sits around 90 mph and he mixes it with a changeup and slider. He aggressively challenges hitters and served as Hofstra's closer for part of his career.

No 87: Jacoby Jones, Pittsburgh Pirates

Johnathon Mayo, MLB.com

Jones can flat-out run, clocking a 4.1 to first base in the Cape Cod League. He's played shortstop, second and the outfield and hasn't found a home anywhere defensively as of yet, with most feeling he's best suited for the outfield when all is said and done.

No 88: Daniel Palka, Arizona Diamondbacks

Baseball America

His grip-it-and-rip-it approach will always lead to strikeouts, and he hasn't added much polish in three seasons. He still has holes down and away or in on his hands, but he has the strength to hit balls out of any park.

No 89: Cord Sandberg, Philadelphia Phillies

Johnathon Mayo, MLB.com

A two-sport star from the Florida high school ranks, Sandberg has the chance to quarterback at Mississippi State should he choose to go that route. He also has the chance to be a very good, toolsy outfielder at the professional level.

No 90: Barrett Astin, Milwaukee Brewers

MLB.com

Astin relies on his low-90s sinker. It has good tailing action and he isn’t afraid to attack hitters with it. His secondary offerings aren’t as well-developed as his fastball, but he has the makings of a solid slider.

No 91: Jacob May, Chicago White Sox

MLB.com

May is a speedy, switch-hitting leadoff type. He has plus speed to steal bases and to run down balls in center field. The rest of his game still needs to be developed.

No 92: Brandon Dixon, Los Angeles Dodgers

Baseball America

He has a quick swing with strength and shows above-average power in batting practice, though in games he shows a flatter stroke. He'll be more of a doubles hitter than a home run threat unless he adds more leverage and loft into his swing.

No 93: Mike Mayers, St. Louis Cardinals

MLB.com

He relies on pitchability and his feel for the craft more than overpowering stuff, but scouts see him as a future Major League starter. Mayers combines his low-90s fastball with a slider and changeup, which has plus potential.

No 94: Jeffrey Thompson, Detroit Tigers

MLB.com

Thompson's fastball sits in the low-90s, and he mixes it with a good slider and changeup. His fastball doesn't have much action, though his arm angle allows him to throw it downhill and create groundballs.

No 95: Kenyan Middleton, Los Angeles Angels

MLB.com

Middleton's elite athleticism, size (he's listed at 6-foot-3, 210 pounds) and tools mean he has plenty of upside, but he is understandably raw on the mound.

No 96: Jan Hernandez, Philadelphia Phillies

Keith Law, ESPN

Hernandez has good bat speed and solid hip rotation, getting a little uphill and collapsing his back side when he becomes too pull-conscious.

No 97: Thomas Milone, Tampa Bay Rays

Baseball America

Teams willing to exercise patience might roll the dice on Milone, a toolsy but raw outfielder. He has a football background so he's physical at 6 feet, 185 pounds, but his limited playing experience on the diamond shows up in games.

No 98: Stephen Tarpley, Baltimore Orioles

Johnathon Mayo, MLB.com

The strong and athletic lefty can crank the fastball up to 94 mph with easy effort. Both his curve and slider can be at least average, if not better. His changeup is behind the breaking stuff, but should also be a Major League average pitch for him.

No 99: David Ledbetter, Texas Rangers

MLB.com

Ledbetter is a two-way player at Cedarville, but he will be a pitcher as a professional. He throws his fastball in the low-90s, regularly touching 94 mph, with good sinking action.

No 100: Ryon Healy, Oakland Athletics

Baseball America

He projects to be an above-average hitter with above-average power. He has a short swing with good loft and bat speed, and he uses the whole field.

No 101: Chase Johnson, San Francisco Giants

MLB.com

Johnson still has good stuff, though, with a fastball up to 93 mph that has good sink to it to go along with a slider and changeup that both have the chance to be Major League average.

No 102: Carlos Salazar, Atlanta Braves

Baseball America

Salazar has a thick, stocky build at 6-foot-2 and 205 pounds with strong legs and a barrel chest. He's aggressive on the mound and practically jumps toward the plate with mechanics similar to those of Jordan Walden.

No 103: Michael O'Neil, New York Yankees

Johnathon Mayo, MLB.com

Paul O'Neill's nephew really knows how to hit, making consistent hard contact and spraying line drives to all fields. He has mostly doubles power, with some room to add strength, and average speed, though he's smart on the basepaths.

No 104: Mark Armstrong, Cincinnati Reds

MLB.com

Armstrong's fastball sits around 90 mph and he mixes in a hard, downer curveball and changeup. Scouts think he has the potential to improve thanks to clean mechanics and his 6-fooot-3, 200-pound frame.

No 105: Drew Ward, Washington Nationals

Baseball America

Ward's best tool is his lefthanded power, and scouts who like him think it could make him a second-round pick. Skeptics think he generates his pop more with strength than bat speed and see him as more of a one-trick pony.

No 106: Chris Kohler, Oakland Athletics

Johnathon Mayo, MLB.com

Kohler will touch 90 mph with his fastball, but there could be more in the tank. He mixes in a downer curve and a fairly deceptive changeup to give him two secondary pitches that should be at least Major League average

More from SB Nation:

MLB draft results: First- and second-round picks

MLB draft: Where do the best players come from?

MLB draft has few surprises in first round

How the MLB draft works

MLB draft: Scouting reports for top prospects

Bois: The fall of the "Beef Animal"

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