Biogenesis leaker turns over missing documents to courts

Benny Sieu-USA TODAY Sports

The man who exposed the Biogenesis scandal appeared in court this past week and provided a grand jury with extensive documents about the clinic.

The man who originally set the Biogenesis scandal in motion by leaking some of the company's documents to the Miami New Times last year, has turned the remainder of the documents in his possession over to a federal grand jury in Miami, reports Mike Fish of ESPN.com.

Porter Fischer's original leak sparked the investigation of a number of high profile players, leading to suspensions for 14 players including Yankees star Alex Rodriguez, 2011 NL MVP Ryan Braun, the Rangers' Nelson Cruz and the Tigers' Jhonny Peralta. Major League Baseball has been pursuing the final documents that Fischer had withheld since the beginning of their investigation, according to Fish.

Fischer, the former marketing director of Biogenesis, also spoke before the grand jury, but the nature of that testimony is still unknown. His appearance before the federal court could signal the beginning of a series of prosecutions of top staffers at the clinic, including founder Tony Bosch, who has been cooperating with Major League Baseball's investigation. Fish reports that over 800 documents were included in the materials Fischer handed over and he speculates that evidence showing Bosch posed as a doctor and provided teenagers with steroid regimens could be contained here.

The U.S. Attorney's Office could neither confirm nor deny the existence of an investigation into such activities, according to Fish, but he cites sources that are saying an investigation coordinated by the Drug Enforcement Administration is under way and beginning to "intensify."

Should the U.S. Attorney prosecute Bosch and others for Biogenesis' activities, the Major League players suspended for their connection to the clinic could be forced to testify concerning the services they received. However, prosecution of these players is unlikely. The Drug Enforcement Administration typically focuses on cases against suppliers, dealers and traffickers and not end users.

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