Good morning, the Knicks gave up 51 points ... in a quarter

Robert Hanashiro-USA TODAY Sport

To the Lakers! That and much more in Wednesday's NBA newsletter.

SB Nation Reebok Retro Week

Good morning. Let's basketball.

'IT WAS AWFUL, HUH': The Knicks gave up 51 points in a single quarter to the Lakers (the Lakers!) en route to a 31-point route at Staples on national television. The 51 points in a quarter? A franchise record for each team. Here's the third quarter box score.

Phil Jackson was in town to catch it and offered up the assessment you see in bold.

THE OPPOSITE OF AWFUL: The Mavericks' overtime win over the Thunder was an instant classic. Never leave us, Dirk.

Anthony Slater writes about how part of the problem for OKC now is not only that Russell Westbrook sits in back-to-backs, but that he's on a minutes restrictions when he plays.

MORE SCORES: There was a real barn-burner in Toronto, plus more action.

BASKETBALL ETIQUETTE: What do you call it when you make a shot just messing around and you want your buddy to return the ball to you? Seth Rosenthal investigates.

In the extended Bay Area/Sacramento area, we were "change" folks. I always thought it was related to the tradition of calling made shots "money." Like, "here's your money, give me change." But "change" may have predated the "money" or "cash" or "straight cash homey" trends, so I don't know.

HAND DOWN, SCAL DOWN: Mark Jackson has demoted Brian Scalabrine in a situation of extreme weirdness, reports Woj.

Also, Jackson allegedly went weeks not speaking to Mike Malone last season and tried to become a candidate for the Clippers and Nets jobs open last summer. Despite being gainfully employed by the rising Warriors. This is a coaching situation that bears watching this summer.

TOM TO THE IZZO: The Pistons are reportedly interested in finally pulling Sparty leader Tom Izzo to the NBA.

HEY, IT'S RETRO WEEK: We have a package for Reebok Retro Week: Prada on how rule changes have altered the modern game, Jason Patt on the best supporting actors of the Bulls dynasty, Flannery on the thunderous revival of basketball in Seattle, Eddie Maisonet on the story of Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf, a new Drive & Kick podcast with SLAM Magazine legend Russ Bengtson, and me on the forefathers of modern NBA stars. Enjoy.

JIMMY GOLDSTEIN IS THE GREATEST, PART INFINITY.

SPEAKING OF MWP: He has thoughts on Dwight Howard and Ryan Kelly.

PRESENTED WITHOUT COMMENT. (Comment will come later this morning in The Hook.)

THE BOBCATS: A team of the future, write Zach Lowe.

THE TROUBLE WITH LOSING: Dan Devine with a totally excellent, nuanced look at the cost of losing by blueprint as it pertains to the Jazz.

SENTENCES I DIDN'T EXPECT TO READ TODAY OR EVER: "Paul Pierce is Neil Young and Crazy Horse. He's a great solo act, but he's much better as the leader of a raggedy ensemble."

PRIME TIME FOR DION: Scott Sargent goes deep on the arrival of Dion Waiters. Dion rewarded him by dropping 24 in a big Cavs win over the Raptors.

SHOCKING: Bob Knight is wrong and needlessly coarse about the NBA and college basketball.

ROBIN LOPEZ: Villain.

WHIMSY: Chili garlic sauce named the top condiment over brown mustard. I had Sriracha over ranch dressing in my finals; don't judge.

Happy Wednesday. See you next time.

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