Paul George admitting he blacked out is not being truthful 'to a fault'

Aaron Doster-USA TODAY Sports

There is no such thing as being "too forthcoming" when it comes to head injuries.

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In an otherwise excellent discussion of Paul George's masterful second half in the Pacers' survival win over the Heat, ESPN's Israel Gutierrez comments on the wing's persistent honesty.

Part of what we're learning about George in his second straight postseason as a leading man is that he's honest to a fault.

He was too forthcoming after suffering a concussion in Game 2, admitting he "blacked out" after Dwyane Wade's knee hit the back of his head.

No, sorry. There's no such thing as "too forthcoming" when it comes to explaining the symptoms of a head injury. In fact, the opposite is often a problem: fearing they'll miss action, players downplay any symptoms they are feeling.

Such was the case with George, who blacked out on the court but told team doctors he was fine. He continued to play. After the game, doctors determined he had a concussion. George was dishonest to a fault: playing through a head injury is dangerous. We know this now more than ever.

There is no such thing as being "honest to a fault" or "too forthcoming" when it comes to head injuries. The team's success is not more important than the health of anyone's brain. Let's keep that in mind when we assess players and their personalities.

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