2011 NCAA Tournament Field: Princeton Beats Harvard On Buzzer Beater To Secure Ivy League Bid

The Princeton Tigers have secured the Ivy League's automatic bid to the 2011 NCAA basketball tournament, defeating the Harvard Crimson 63-62 on an incredible buzzer beating shot from Douglas Davis. The end of the second half of the match was an incredible up and down battle with lead change after lead change, but it was Princeton who pulled it out in the end with a shot so close, the officials had to review. Upon replay, the ball left Davis's hand with 0.2 seconds remaining on the game clock.

If Harvard had won the game, it would have been their first bid into the NCAA tournament since 1942. While a very big longshot for an at-large bid, getting into the tournament is not completely out of the question for the Crimson. They have an RPI under 50 with only one bad loss, away to Yale, but their record of 3-4 against the RPI top 100 is unlikely to be good enough to get them into the tournament.

Princeton had an RPI that was sub-50 going into this game, according to some rankings, and that will only improve as a result of this win over Harvard. The Tigers could manage to pull themselves into a 13 or 12 seed position, meaning a first round upset wouldn't be completely out of the question.

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