2013 NFL Draft results: Tharold Simon, Lavar Edwards add to LSU's haul

Ezra Shaw

Eight LSU players are off the board, with Tharold Simon and Lavar Edwards selected early in the fifth round.

A pair of LSU players went off the board early in the fifth round, as Tharold Simon's run-in with the law didn't hurt his draft stock and Lavar Edwards became the third LSU pass-rusher to be selected. The Seahawks and Titans picked Simon and Edwards, respectively.

Elsewhere, the Cardinals added Stanford's all-time leading pass-rusher, the Jets added another Virginia offensive lineman and the Colts took a chance on a big defensive tackle who needed to go to a small school

No. 138, Seattle Seahawks, from Raiders: Tharold Simon, CB, LSU

There were questions about whether an arrest Thursday night -- for getting on the wrong side of a policeman, even though witnesses say he didn't do anything wrong -- would hurt Simon. And apparently it didn't, as Simon seemed like a fourth- or fifth-rounder. The Seahawks had just taken defensive tackle Jesse Williams at No. 137. On the college career of the 6'2 corner, which ended when he declared early as a junior:

Simon, 22, was a highly recruited prospect out of high school, but served as a backup cornerback in each of his first two seasons with the Tigers, as the talented secondary featured several top players, including Patrick Peterson, Morris Claiborne and Tyrann Mathieu. It wasn't until his junior season that he became a full-time starter, finishing the season with nine pass break-ups and four interceptions.

No. 139, Indianapolis Colts (from Browns): Montori Hughes, DT, Tennessee-Martin

The Colts nabbed another defensive lineman after picking Bjoern Werner in the first round, going with a small school prospect with big-time size at 6'4, 329 pounds. Hughes had originally committed to Tennessee, but was eventually dismissed from the squad and needed to go to the Skyhawks to continue his football career. From a post naming Hughes to SB Nation's all-underrated team:

The second Tennessee-Martin player to crack this list, Montori Hughes is somewhat of an underachiever. Academic issues postponed his college football career, and he never stuck at Tennessee due to a variety of academic and disciplinary issues. Off-the-field problems aside, Hughes can play. Possessing the size to play nose tackle in the NFL, Hughes shows a quick burst of the line of scrimmage and the strength to drive blockers into the backfield. Against Northern Illinois, the game I studied closely, Martin consistently held his ground and flashed the ability to get into the backfield. He's rough around the edges. Questions will arise about his attitude and work ethic, but Hughes has legitimate potential as a nose tackle prospect. He needs to learn the finer points of the game and play with a more consistent motor, but based on upside along, Hughes is worth a shot on day three.

No. 140, Arizona Cardinals: Stepfan Taylor, RB, Stanford

Stanford's all-time rushing leader will provide depth for Rashard Mendenhall, who the Cardinals signed in March. He's the third Stanford guy taken after tight ends Zach Ertz and Levine Toilolo -- a writeup on Taylor.

Taylor took over the reins in Stanford's backfield a Heisman finalist in Toby Gerhart and would have been forgiven for not filling the current Minnesota Vikings' footsteps. Instead, he just set the school's all-time records for rushing yards and touchdowns. Taylor got 1,137 yards on 5.1 yards per carry as a sophomore, and both numbers went up as a junior, getting 1,330 yards on 5.5 per carry. His senior year, the team's offense essentially consisted of handing him the ball 20-30 times a game and hoping for the best, and it worked, as he ended up with 1,530 yards on 322 carries. He earned offensive MVP in the Rose Bowl for his 88 yards and a touchdown.

There's nothing Taylor does that's great - he runs the 40-yard-dash in over 4.7 seconds, he doesn't make lightning-quick cuts, he isn't built like a tank - but he does pretty much everything well.Taylor doesn't have an elite characteristic that's going to earn him a starting spot. He lacks tremendous explosion. But he could set up as a decent backup for a while, especially with his strength, blocking, and pass-catching abilities setting him up nicely as a third-down back.

No. 141, New York Jets: Oday Aboushi, G, Virginia

Aboushi joins a Jets offensive line that already features a Virginia lineman as its rock, left tackle D'Brickashaw Ferguson. On Aboushi:

At 6'6, Aboushi already has the length and also has the frame to pack on more pounds.

He possesses the right attitude both on the field and in the film room. On the field he loves to hit and take his man to the ground whenever possible. During the week he is vigilant about watching video and critiquing his own play.

No. 142, Tennessee Titans: Lavar Edwards, DE, LSU

The third LSU pass-rusher off the board -- Barkevious Mingo and Sam Montgomery were first -- Edwards' strength is, well, his strength. Just because he had to deal with a stacked depth chart at LSU doesn't mean he's not a talent:

SB Nation's Ryan Van Bibber calls Edwards a "big strong guy who isn't going to be the fastest lineman on the field, but has the high motor that teams will like."

More from SB Nation:

X
Log In Sign Up

forgot?
Log In Sign Up

Forgot password?

We'll email you a reset link.

If you signed up using a 3rd party account like Facebook or Twitter, please login with it instead.

Forgot password?

Try another email?

Almost done,

By becoming a registered user, you are also agreeing to our Terms and confirming that you have read our Privacy Policy.

Join SBNation.com

You must be a member of SBNation.com to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at SBNation.com. You should read them.

Join SBNation.com

You must be a member of SBNation.com to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at SBNation.com. You should read them.

Spinner.vc97ec6e

Authenticating

Great!

Choose an available username to complete sign up.

In order to provide our users with a better overall experience, we ask for more information from Facebook when using it to login so that we can learn more about our audience and provide you with the best possible experience. We do not store specific user data and the sharing of it is not required to login with Facebook.