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thenonpareil

  • joined Dec 20, 2009
  • last login Jul 25, 2014
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User Blog

The Uncertainty Principle: Nonito Donaire Squares Off Against Toshiaki Nishioka

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When Nonito Donaire knocked out Fernando Montiel in the second round of their February 2011 bout, it appeared as if his potential met his preeminent talent and unquestioned dominance was in his immediate future. But over his next three fights, two of them in a new division, that dominance was put into question. Toshiaki Nishioka, whom he’ll face on October 13th at the Home Depot Center in Carson, California, is the type to command answers. Read more from The Cruelest Sport

The Uncertainty Principle: Nonito Donaire Squares Off Against Toshiaki Nishioka

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When Nonito Donaire knocked out Fernando Montiel in the second round of their February 2011 bout, it appeared as if his potential met his preeminent talent and unquestioned dominance was in his immediate future. But over his next three fights, two of them in a new division, that dominance was put into question. Toshiaki Nishioka, whom he’ll face on October 13th at the Home Depot Center in Carson, California, is the type to command answers. Read more from The Cruelest Sport

SOMETHING WILD: The Hectic Days & Frantic Nights Of Hector "Macho" Camacho

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Emerging from the slashing switchblade streets of 1970s Spanish Harlem—not a neighborhood listed in Baedeker—Hector Camacho was one of the brightest young stars of the 1980s. Breathtakingly fast—like a shot from a Widowmaker—this gifted southpaw was all dashing streetpunk flash. Before mirrorball after mirrorball called his number and the yayo refused to let him go, Camacho was considered a lock for true ring greatness. It never happened. Stalled by party hats, battles with promotional fat cats, and a never-ending case of the continental NYPD blues, Camacho was headline news and earned millions, but he never came close to reaching his limitless potential. Read more from The Living Daylights

SOMETHING WILD: The Hectic Days & Frantic Nights Of Hector "Macho" Camacho

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Emerging from the slashing switchblade streets of 1970s Spanish Harlem—not a neighborhood listed in Baedeker—Hector Camacho was one of the brightest young stars of the 1980s. Breathtakingly fast—like a shot from a Widowmaker—this gifted southpaw was all dashing streetpunk flash. Before mirrorball after mirrorball called his number and the yayo refused to let him go, Camacho was considered a lock for true ring greatness. It never happened. Stalled by party hats, battles with promotional fat cats, and a never-ending case of the continental NYPD blues, Camacho was headline news and earned millions, but he never came close to reaching his limitless potential. Read more from The Living Daylights

DISHING IT OUT: On Klitschko-Charr, James Kirkland, Amir Khan, And Alexander-Bailey

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It’s fitting that junior-middleweight roughneck James Kirkland has accused trainers Ann Wolfe and "Pops" Billingsley of giving him two black pills that left him in a stupor prior to his disqualification victory over Carlos Molina last March. Kirkland’s recent purging of his camp strikes one as a decision concocted under the influence, the type of rash move made by an unruly brat filled to the gills with liquid courage or hopped up on pharmaceuticals. Read more from The Cruelest Sport

"We Were Young Together Once": Top 20 Favorite Fighters Of The 1980s, A Personal Reminiscence

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After losing to Hamsho, Czyz fell on hard times: His father committed suicide, he was blacklisted by the networks, and he was arrested on burglary charges. Although Czyz was ratings dynamite—his win over Robbie Sims set a record for NBC SportsWorld in 1982—he vanished from network television for nearly half a decade because of managerial issues, weight problems, injuries, Ferdie Pacheco—take your pick. Finally, after years in limbo, Czyz won a world title at light heavyweight by stopping Slobodan Kacar in 1986. Read more from The Living Daylights

One Long Season In Hell: Michael Dokes 1958-2012

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There is no jet-set as low-rent as the prizefight jet-set and Dokes was soon off on one merrymaking junket after another, surrounded by the leeches that would eventually drain his blood and end up sucking at the marrow. "Once you get into that life and get that kind of money…" Dokes haltingly explained to The Akron Beacon Journal in 2010. "…last night we were talking about the people we were around—the toughest gangsters, the biggest entrepreneurs. It was probably more than we probably should have been biting on at the time, but I was just caught up in it." Read more from The Cruelest Sport

One Long Season In Hell: Michael Dokes 1958-2012

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There is no jet-set as low-rent as the prizefight jet-set and Dokes was soon off on one merrymaking junket after another, surrounded by the leeches that would eventually drain his blood and end up sucking at the marrow. "Once you get into that life and get that kind of money…" Dokes haltingly explained to The Akron Beacon Journal in 2010. "…last night we were talking about the people we were around—the toughest gangsters, the biggest entrepreneurs. It was probably more than we probably should have been biting on at the time, but I was just caught up in it." Read more from The Cruelest Sport

The Catastrophist: The Troubled World Of Don Jordan

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"Chaos" is the only suitable word to describe the career of Don Jordan. Fifty years after he first won the welterweight title, Jordan remains a mystery without a solution. Not only did Jordan bewilder spectators with his desultory performances, he also mystified trainers, sports writers, police officers, mobsters, and historians, few of whom have bothered to trace a career that reads more like a case study than the narrative of a boxer. Welterweight champion only long enough to make two defenses and accidentally TKO nefarious Frankie Carbo, Jordan left behind a legacy as befuddling as that of Iron Eyes Cody or D.B. Cooper. Like many fighters in the 1950s, Jordan was dogged by ties to mobsters, but it was his own instability that ultimately led to his spectacular crash. Read more from The Cruelest Sport

The Catastrophist: The Troubled World Of Don Jordan

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"Chaos" is the only suitable word to describe the career of Don Jordan. Fifty years after he first won the welterweight title, Jordan remains a mystery without a solution. Not only did Jordan bewilder spectators with his desultory performances, he also mystified trainers, sports writers, police officers, mobsters, and historians, few of whom have bothered to trace a career that reads more like a case study than the narrative of a boxer. Welterweight champion only long enough to make two defenses and accidentally TKO nefarious Frankie Carbo, Jordan left behind a legacy as befuddling as that of Iron Eyes Cody or D.B. Cooper. Like many fighters in the 1950s, Jordan was dogged by ties to mobsters, but it was his own instability that ultimately led to his spectacular crash. Read more from The Cruelest Sport

JAGGED EDGE: When Iran Barkley And Michael Olajide Waged War In NYC

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He had a scowl that could clear out the D train during morning rush hour. Iran Barkley, once a member of the Black Spades when street gangs roamed the lawless, lightless badlands of the Bronx during the Golden Age of urban blight, was a rawboned powerpuncher fueled by rage. Barkley was all seething ire for much of the "Me, Me, Me" decade. The targets of his anger? The top money ranks, embodied by the trio of Marvin Hagler, Thomas Hearns, and Ray Leonard, who cashed oversized paychecks with both glee and regularity. Read more from The Living Daylights

JAGGED EDGE: When Iran Barkley And Michael Olajide Waged War In NYC

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He had a scowl that could clear out the D train during morning rush hour. Iran Barkley, once a member of the Black Spades when street gangs roamed the lawless, lightless badlands of the Bronx during the Golden Age of urban blight, was a rawboned powerpuncher fueled by rage. Barkley was all seething ire for much of the "Me, Me, Me" decade. The targets of his anger? The top money ranks, embodied by the trio of Marvin Hagler, Thomas Hearns, and Ray Leonard, who cashed oversized paychecks with both glee and regularity. Read more from The Living Daylights

Some Kind Of Wonderful: The Title Reign Of Marvelous Marvin Hagler

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January 17, 1981 Not even Marvin Hagler knew his name. Not really. "What’s his name? Fully Obel?" he asked the press corps after scoring a dominant 8th-round TKO over undefeated Venezuelan Fulgencio Obelmejias at the Boston Garden. Part of the first wave of Alphabet Soup Group refugees, Obelmejias might as well have been a stowaway, hidden somewhere in the hull of a New England whaler and surprised to emerge docked at the foot of a prizefight ring. With a 30-0 record built up by belting out numberless desaparecidos, Obelmejias was as ready for Hagler as he was for the blizzard that left Massachusetts looking like some sort of lost lunar landscape, all snowdrifts and perpetual gray twilight. A far cry, indeed, from the tropical climate of Venezuela. Read more from The Living Daylights

Some Kind Of Wonderful: The Title Reign Of Marvelous Marvin Hagler

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January 17, 1981 Not even Marvin Hagler knew his name. Not really. "What’s his name? Fully Obel?" he asked the press corps after scoring a dominant 8th-round TKO over undefeated Venezuelan Fulgencio Obelmejias at the Boston Garden. Part of the first wave of Alphabet Soup Group refugees, Obelmejias might as well have been a stowaway, hidden somewhere in the hull of a New England whaler and surprised to emerge docked at the foot of a prizefight ring. With a 30-0 record built up by belting out numberless desaparecidos, Obelmejias was as ready for Hagler as he was for the blizzard that left Massachusetts looking like some sort of lost lunar landscape, all snowdrifts and perpetual gray twilight. A far cry, indeed, from the tropical climate of Venezuela. Read more from The Living Daylights

The Head-Scratcher: Selcuk Aydin-Robert Guerrero Preview

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Naturally, Aydin’s ammunition looks to produce far more damage. Guerrero showcased an exemplary level of toughness in the lower weight divisions, but Joel Casamayor putting him on his trunks indicated that his chin isn’t undentable, and he’s facing a man far bigger and stronger. The Turkish puncher (ambitiously nicknamed "Mini-Tyson") has a respectable punch, the type of power that can leave Guerrero floored if he catches a well-timed overhand right or left hook. Read more from The Cruelest Sport.

"We Were Young Together Once": Top 20 Favorite Fighters Of The 1980s, A Personal Reminiscence

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First, he destroyed one of my heroes, the unassuming accountant-like Donald Curry, in a fight that was considered the biggest upset of its day—until Buster Douglas took Mike Tyson behind the bamboo shed in Tokyo a few years later. Then, oblivious to menacing nicknames, he brutalized "Mad Dog" Gene Hatcher and Johnny "Bump City" Bumphus in less than five minutes combined. Read more from The Living Daylights.

The Head-Scratcher: Selcuk Aydin-Robert Guerrero Preview

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Naturally, Aydin’s ammunition looks to produce far more damage. Guerrero showcased an exemplary level of toughness in the lower weight divisions, but Joel Casamayor putting him on his trunks indicated that his chin isn’t undentable, and he’s facing a man far bigger and stronger. The Turkish puncher (ambitiously nicknamed "Mini-Tyson") has a respectable punch, the type of power that can leave Guerrero floored if he catches a well-timed overhand right or left hook. Read more from The Cruelest Sport.

The Year Of Living Dangerously: Alan Minter In 1980

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1980 would be a memorable year for Alan Minter, as the British southpaw battled through a tumultuous three-fight series of middleweight title contests, beginning with a trip across the Atlantic to meet iron-jawed champion Vito Antuofermo at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. Minter settled for bronze at the 1972 Olympics after a highly controversial semi-final loss, and his early career followed a rocky path. After losing six times, all on cuts, there was a feeling that Minter would never reach the pinnacle. However, a £50 visit to a plastic surgeon to discover the root of his fragile skin delivered a career-changing answer--stop getting hit so much. A change of styles followed, with a more controlled Minter running off an 8-fight winning streak to secure a meeting with the brawling Brooklyn fighter. Read more from The Living Daylights

MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE: An Interview With Marvin Johnson

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For nearly fifteen years, Marvin "Pops" Johnson, three-time light heavyweight champion and 1972 Olympic bronze medalist, was one of the most unassuming bonechillers in boxing. A swarming southpaw banger, Johnson was an amateur standout back in the days when the unpaid ranks were more than just pitty-pat contests. As a pro, Johnson believed in havoc at the opening bell and set a blistering pace from wire to wire.How this quiet and religious man could transform into such a furious whirlwind between the ropes is a mystery. From The Living Daylights

RUMBLEFISH: Earl Hargrove

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A two-fisted banger with a vicious temperament, Hargrove knocked out his first 24 opponents, raising one hell of a ruckus along the Eastern Seaboard. Because few of his KO victims were considered ironmen, Hargrove began drawing whispers as well. Indeed, his first dozen foes managed to win only one fight between them. Under the tutelage of defensive guru Georgie Benton, Hargrove tried to hone his ferocity, but his raw power carried him away like a high wind carries off your hat in Chicago. Read more from The Living Daylights

BAD INTENTIONS: The Mike Tyson Saga

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In the mid-1980s, Mike Tyson was considered the heavyweight messiah. And, for a little while, at least, he was almost worth worshiping…from the comfort of your living room. Honed to destructive perfection by the Freudian Mad Hatter of the Catskill Mountains, Cus D’Amato, Tyson, the youngest heavyweight champion in history—and the first undisputed kingpin since Leon Spinks—tore through most of his fatso opposition with easeful savagery. Ditto the American psyche. Read more from The Living Daylights

BAD INTENTIONS: The Mike Tyson Saga

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In the mid-1980s, Mike Tyson was considered the heavyweight messiah. And, for a little while, at least, he was almost worth worshiping…from the comfort of your living room. Honed to destructive perfection by the Freudian Mad Hatter of the Catskill Mountains, Cus D’Amato, Tyson, the youngest heavyweight champion in history—and the first undisputed kingpin since Leon Spinks—tore through most of his fatso opposition with easeful savagery. Ditto the American psyche. From The Living Daylights

Going To The Dogs: Danny Garcia TKO4 Amir Khan

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With a little under 30 seconds to go in the third, Garcia caught Khan— in the midst of curling a sloppy right uppercut from his hip-with a crushing left hook to the side of the neck. Khan, now 26-3 (18), went down like a grandfather clock knocked over in a half-empty antique store. Somehow he rose, on mutinous legs, at the count of four. Referee Kenny Bayless gave Khan a hard look—and precious extra seconds—before allowing him to continue, but the bell rang before Garcia could end matters then and there. Read more from The Cruelest Sport

Going To The Dogs: Danny Garcia TKO4 Amir Khan

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At times, Khan, 25, has looked like the real right thing in the ring, but with the exception of a handful of fighters, the top money ranks in boxing are illusory, products of the feverish HBO/Showtime/P-4-P imagination. Having been painted in gold from head to toe—like the poor Gold Boy in Bedlam—Khan has finally smothered beneath the veneer. Unlike Garcia, who has proven his durability by taking flush shots from a bomber like Kendall Holt, Khan does not have a particularly sturdy chin. Add this defect to his other weaknesses—getting too close when flurrying, standing straight up before his opponent, poor infighting skills, and a tendency to freeze when in trouble—and you have a fighter whose limitations may very well outstrip his attributes. Read more from The Cruelest Sport

Straw Boss: David Haye TKO5 Dereck Chisora

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An absence of class precipitated the heavyweight tilt staged between David Haye and Dereck Chisora in Upton Park, London, yesterday; a stark difference in class settled it. Haye, with perhaps his most impressive display of speed and power as a heavyweight, dispatched of Chisora via fifth-round TKO. Read more from The Cruelest Sport

Straw Boss: David Haye TKO5 Dereck Chisora

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An absence of class precipitated the heavyweight tilt staged between David Haye and Dereck Chisora in Upton Park, London, yesterday; a stark difference in class settled it. Haye, with perhaps his most impressive display of speed and power as a heavyweight, dispatched of Chisora via fifth-round TKO. Read more from The Cruelest Sport

AMERICAN DREAMER: Davey Moore TKO6 Tadashi Mihara

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With only eight pro fights under his belt, they sent Davey Moore to the Land of the Rising Sun on a mission. Moore, out of the South Bronx wasteland of Melrose, was a cloak and dagger pawn for Bob Arum, who had tapped the taboo South African market in the name of laissez faire. For "Bottom Line Bob," apartheid was a mere afterthought. From The Living Daylights

The Horror Of It All: David Haye-Dereck Chisora Preview

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The spirit of P.T. Barnum makes a transatlantic crossing when David Haye and Dereck Chisora square off in London tomorrow night at Upton Park in a 10-round scrap for the British Empire Dustbin Championship. Barnum, "The Prince of Humbugs," would no doubt have found his funny bone tickled vigorously week after week knowing that more than 30,000 fans shelled out millions of shekels to see a set-to between a journeyman heavyweight—Chisora—and a mouthy morning glory—Haye—whose last performance in the ring was universally condemned as a disgrace. From The Cruelest Sport

The Horror Of It All: David Haye-Dereck Chisora Preview

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Ignominy is as much a part of boxing as the right cross is. Two boors bashing each other about in public—something you could see on a regular basis at the St. Helier Tavern 20 years ago—is nothing to get alarmed about. But the capsizing of regulatory protocol is. By shunting aside the BBBoC, Frank Warren has set a dangerous precedent. According to the BBC, the Luxembourg Boxing Federation was paid to oversee this fight. Whether remuneration is strictly a sanctioning fee based on a percentage of revenues is irrelevant—buying and selling licenses in a blood sport is vile, regardless of EBU membership. From The Cruelest Sport

NEON NIGHTS: Leon Spinks In The 1980s

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Dead presidents were the kiss of death for this confused young man who had grown up in the Pruitt-Igoe housing project. With lottery-sized earnings from two fights against Ali, the 1976 Olympic gold medalist and ex-Marine went AWOL from reality for the rest of the decade. When he returned, in the midst of 1980s excess, he must have been surprised at how little glitz was reserved for him. From The Living Daylights
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