clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Sampson Deported from Nation of Basketball

New, comments

↵
↵Kelvin Sampson has been stripped of his citizenship of the country of Basketballlandia. Under the NCAA ruling being reported, the former Indiana coach received the hammer of the gods treatment from the NCAA in his rules violation case, a dreaded "show-cause penalty" of five years in length. ↵

↵What does that mean? It means that if Sampson is hired for any job, then that institution "needs to demonstrate to the COI that sufficient disciplinary action against the coach has been taken since he or she has found to violate NCAA rules." This seems a bit roundabout, and with good reason. The NCAA is an organization of schools, and cannot take action against individuals. It's not like they can punish Sampson in any way personally, since he's just an employee of the institution, and the NCAA only regulates those institutions. ↵

↵

↵What they can do is slap a biohazard tag on him and label him as "toxic and not fit for consumption by NCAA schools," which is in essence what a show-cause penalty does. Schools interested in Sampson would have to punish him for his past sins, a headache no school wants to undertake. How hard is it to get a job after you've been show-caused? It took former Cal coach Todd Bozeman 10 years after earning an eight-year show-cause to find a job, so calling it "nigh-impossible" would be fair. ↵

↵

↵Compare it to doing something really dastardly to a woman. You got away with it in the short term, but then she began posting embarrassing videos on Youtube, and detailing each and every last one of your shortcomings on her blog, and finally divulging to the world on Facebook that, every two months or so, you wet the bed and had to sleep in diapers for a week or so. It's community shaming on a grand scale, and it means Kelvin Sampson will have to go very, very far out of his old dating pool to find work. ↵

↵

↵On the upside, Indiana itself will benefit from self-imposed penalties and escapes unscathed. ↵

↵

This post originally appeared on the Sporting Blog. For more, see The Sporting Blog Archives.