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Omar Minaya Shows What Kind of Person He Is

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I've had this discussion for a long time. There are 'good work people' and there are 'good people.' Working in sports, you meet a lot of 'good work people' – people who are good at their jobs and succeed no matter who they step on – but finding 'good people' – you know the type of person I'd trust to watch my daughter for an afternoon - is often a tougher task. ↵

↵In his press conference to announce the firing of executive Tony Bernazard, Minaya tried to explain that, while Bernazard may not have been well liked – a good person, if you will – he was a good baseball person. ↵

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↵⇥"Look, was Tony the most liked person in the world? No he was not. We know that. There's a lot of people that are not, sometimes, well liked, and, you know, they have been good baseball people. But, you know, I could tell you – was he the most liked person in the world? No. Was he a good baseball person? Yes." ↵
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↵That's a pretty ironic statement coming from Minaya, who earlier in the press conference called out New York Daily News reporter Adam Rubin for wanting a job in the Mets player personnel department, an accusation that Minaya stated caused him to "kind of tell myself, 'Wow, these things are coming out.'" ↵

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↵Wow indeed. A beat reporter uncovered a story that led to an internal investigation that led to an employee being fired. Oh, and the GM admitted in the press conference announcing said termination that the fired employee was not well liked. But Minaya took the opportunity to, what, try and turn the media against one of its own? Minaya all but accused Rubin of trying to steal Bernazard's job with his reporting, an allegation that Rubin – who was in the room during this press conference – asked Minaya to clarify. Minaya replied (transcription via Deadspin via Amazin' Avenue): ↵

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↵⇥“I said, because, when the reports came out a lot of these things were cross... I said 'Who's writing these reports?' and I said well okay who's writing the reports and in the back of my mind, Adam, you have told me you have told other people in the front office that you want to work for player development in the front office.” ↵
↵At what point in the video can you see Minaya's face drop, realizing his plan to discredit Rubin's reporting, after Bernazard was already fired, wasn't going to play in that room full of reporters? ↵

↵Did Minaya deflect some of the attention away from the giant mess he's created in Queens? Sure, a little. Following the press conference, Rubin was the man surrounded by cameras and microphones. In his follow up blog entry, Rubin is faced with defending his credibility as a reporter, writing: ↵

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↵⇥“I want to get something straight. ↵⇥

↵⇥“Everything I wrote about Tony Bernazard - bombshell stories that appeared in the pages of the Daily News over the last week - is accurate. My reporting was solid, met the journalistic standards of sourcing and beyond and was untainted by any personal agenda on my part. ↵⇥

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↵⇥“The Mets fired Bernazard Monday, after conducting an investigation that presumably reflected the damning information contained in my stories.” ↵⇥

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↵With his moves to try and make the Mets a contender in the last few years, Minaya has shown he's not exactly what one might call a 'good baseball person.' From a GM perspective, you're probably not doing the best job when one of the NY tabloids calls you Mr. Mess. ↵

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↵Yesterday, by calling out Rubin in front of a room of his peers, and with the watchful eye of television – and the internet and everyone on the American sports landscape – Minaya showed he's not a very good person either. ↵

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This post originally appeared on the Sporting Blog. For more, see The Sporting Blog Archives.