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NFL Combine results: Winners and losers from the QBs on the bench press, 40-yard dash, and other workouts

Josh Allen and Lamar Jackson made a mark on the NFL Combine in Indianapolis.

Goodyear Cotton Bowl - USC v Ohio State Photo by Ron Jenkins/Getty Images

Quarterbacks are always put under the biggest of microscopes at the NFL Combine. It’s how it’s always been, and how it will always be.

This year, there are five quarterbacks who are being looked at more than others. Sam Darnold, Josh Allen, Lamar Jackson, Josh Rosen, and Baker Mayfield. It’s hard to tell where these guys will land in the NFL, but this week at the combine will undoubtedly have an affect in shaping out the April draft.

Winners:

Josh Allen is considered one of the top quarterbacks in the draft, and he helped solidify his status at the combine. He ran a 4.75 40-yard dash, while also ranking first in his vertical and broad jumps. And of course, he showed off his cannon of an arm.

Baker Mayfield also had himself a good combine. He ran a solid 4.84, looked good in his throwing drills, and of course — exuded confidence:

Lamar Jackson also has to be a winner. He sent a message by not running the 40-yard dash after there had been (and will continue to be) people suggesting he play wide receiver, and do wide receiver drills.

“I didn’t want to show it out here, they’ve been talking about receiver and stuff like that so I didn’t feel I should do it,” Jackson said via Sporting News. ”At first I was going to run, as a quarterback, but then they said wide receiver and I had to let them know I was just going to throw today.”

Losers:

If we’re going strictly from a measurables standopint, Western Kentucky’s Mike White is an immediate mention. His times were all among the lowest, and all below historical averages.

We’re going to mention Sam Darnold here, because he took criticism for not participating in throwing drills. Though it’s very easy to argue that Darnold has more to lose than to gain by throwing at the NFL Combine, with many believing the Browns could take him No. 1 overall in the draft. Plus, Darnold promised he throw at USC’s pro day later in the month.

Here’s how things unfolded for the quarterbacks on Friday and Saturday.

40-yard dash

Who helped themselves:

  • South Florida’s Quinton Flowers ran the best unofficial 40 time of a quarterback with a 4.64 on his first attempt. He ran a 4.70 on his second attempt, which still would have been better than anyone else’s first or second attempt
  • Ohio State’s J.T. Barrett ran an unofficial 4.71 on his second attempt, after running a 4.76 on his first attempt. It was the second best unofficial time of all quarterbacks. His official time would come out at 4.70.

Who didn’t help themselves:

  • Western Kentucky’s Mike White had the worst unofficial times with a 5.08 on his first attempt, and a 5.10 on his second.
  • Memphis’ Riley Ferguson had the second-worst unofficial 40 times with 4.99 runs on his first and second attempts. His official time would be 4.98. He wasn’t exactly known as a fast quarterback, but he probably could have gone without that on the record.

See the full results right here.

Vertical jump

Who helped themselves:

  • Josh Allen had the most impressive vertical of any quarterback with a 33.5-inch leap. He’s already one of the top prospects in the draft, and his showing of leg strength will only help him.
  • Nebraska quarterback Tanner Lee had the second-best vertical with a 32-inch vertical. He’s not considered one of the top prizes among the position, so anywhere he can get an advantage is good.
  • Josh Rosen’s vertical leap was 31 inches, which isn’t quite that of Allen’s, but he’s right in the neighborhood.

Who didn’t help themselves:

  • Sam Darnold, whose leap was just 26.5 inches. A lot of people will probably downplay this because how often do you need your quarterback to jump when throwing the ball. But it showed his base might not be as strong and versatile as the others.
  • Oklahoma State’s Mason Rudolph is considered one of the middle of the pack quarterbacks in the draft, and had the worst vertical at just 26 inches.

See the full results right here.

Broad jump

Who helped themselves:

  • Josh Allen is the biggest winner here with his 9’11 jump. The historical average is 9’2, and he was the only one who really put a dent in that number.
  • Tanner Lee did good here as well, with a 9’7 jump. It was the second best score among quarterbacks. He had a good day of measurements for somebody who isn’t getting as much hype as the others.

Who didn’t help themselves:

  • Sam Darnold’s measurement here was also rather low, with an 8’9 broad jump. We’ll see after Saturday how much weight these measurements hold in mock drafts.
  • Mike White from Western Kentucky just didn’t have a good workout, and that stayed true here with just an 8’0 broad jump.

See the full results right here.

3-cone drill

Who helped themselves:

  • USF’s Quinton Flowers had the best time with a 6.81. He also shined in the 40-yard dash, as well as the broad jump.
  • Josh Allen recorded a 6.90, further displaying his athletic ability to complement his size.
  • Logan Woodside (great name) recorded a 6.94, which was good for the third-best time among the quarterbacks.

Who didn’t help themselves:

  • J.T. Barrett had one of the least impressive times with a 7.38, though he did have a good day throwing the football.
  • Western Kentucky’s Mike White had the worst time among quarterbacks, with a 7.50.

See the full results right here.

20-yard shuttle run

Who helped themselves:

  • Richmond’s Kyle Lauletta had the best time among quarterbacks with a 4.07, nearly 0.3 seconds under the position average.
  • Logan Woodside again showed his ability to change direction with this one, boasting the second-best time with 4.15.

Who didn’t help themselves:

  • Quinton Flowers struggled with this one, posting a 4.57 — the worst time among all quarterbacks.
  • The only other score in the 4.5’s was Marshall’s Chase Litton, who had a 4.53.

See the full results right here.

Bench Press

The first test the quarterbacks faced was the bench press on Friday. Well, it was the first test for one quarterback.

Notable performances: Virginia’s Kurt Benkert, because he did it. 16 reps.