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The 10 least powerful people in college football

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Don't forget about the little guys.

Matthew Emmons-USA TODAY Sports

There are thousands upon thousands of people directly involved with college football. Some are so powerful that their actions and statements control all of what goes on in the sport (Nick Saban and probably others). Others flail, but nothing really ever happens.

Sports Illustrated's Andy Staples believes these 10 to be the most powerful in college sports. What follows here are the 10 least powerful in college football. These people try and try so hard, but nothing they do matters. Feel for them.

1. Mark Emmert, NCAA president

Letting technicalities prevent a full enforcement of NCAA regulations? Check.

Failing to profit from the organization's richest sport? Check.

2. Stephanie Druley, VP of production at Longhorn Network

Druley isn't exactly powerless. She holds tremendous sway with the 14 people who can watch the Longhorn Network in their homes.

3. Mike Aresco, conference formerly known as Big East commissioner

What's that you say? How can he be so powerless when the league attracted the likes of TCU Boise State San Diego State Tulane and kept Pittsburgh Syracuse Rutgers Louisville South Florida around?

4. Matt Joeckel, Texas A&M quarterback

Sorority girl: Are you a football player?

Joeckel: Yep, I'm a quarterback.

Sorority girl: You're Johnny Football?

5. Geno Smith, former West Virginia quarterback

He doesn't play college football anymore.

6. Whoever's blocking Jadaveon Clowney

He's not a robot. There has to be some chance of ...

Clowney

Okay. Maybe he is a robot.

7. The Kansas Jayhawks

Screenshot_2013-03-06_at_11

8. Every kicker

Not a single field goal was made in the 2012 college football season, probably. Do coaches know this?

9. Keith Patterson, West Virginia defensive coordinator

Congratulations on your new position, Mr. Patterson. You won't be coordinating in a traditional "attempting to stop the offense" sense. The key is to get the ball back to Dana Holgersen's offense as fast as possible. Three-and-outs are quick, but 70-yard touchdowns are quicker. Keep that in mind.

10. Mark Richt, Georgia head coach

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