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2013 BYU football's 10 things to know: Identity, an ambitious schedule, and KVN4Heisman

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BYU couldn't keep a quarterback healthy in 2012, and its offensive issues (and some turnovers luck) wasted the efforts of what was perhaps the most fun defense in the country to watch. The defense is thinner, but the offense could be healthy enough to meet the challenge of what is one hell of a 2013 schedule. For more on Cougars football, visit BYU community Vanquish The Foe.

Kirby Lee-USA TODAY Sports

Confused? Check out the glossary here.

1. Progressing toward the mean

On Tuesday, we talked about a Navy team that benefited severely from close-game bounces; the Midshipmen went 4-0 in one-possession games to finish 8-5 despite looking pretty awful on paper.

Today, we talk about the opposite effect. On paper, BYU was a Top 25 team. The Cougars had one of the best defenses in the country, replete with an absolutely terrifying front seven, and thrived despite a directionless offense. But they lost nearly three points per game to turnovers luck, lost three games by three or fewer points, and went 1-4 overall in one-possession games. With Navy's luck, BYU might have gone 11-2 or 12-1 in 2012. Instead, the Cougars finished with Navy's record (8-5) despite finishing 74 spots higher in the F/+ rankings.

Of course, it's only fair, I guess. In 2011, BYU went 4-1 in one-possession games and finished 10-3 despite a No. 40 F/+ ranking. Like Navy, the Cougars simply got their records reversed. Whereas 2012 should have been seen as the culmination of a three-year rebuilding process for head coach Bronco Mendenhall, it was instead seen as one big pile of frustration. With a defense that allowed its fewest points in 33 years, BYU was great at staying close and terrible at closing the deal, losing by three points at rival Utah, by one point at Boise State, by three points at Notre Dame, and by six points at San Jose State. So close.

In 2013, we'll see if the luck stabilizes a bit. We'll also see if BYU can figure out what the hell it wants to be on offense, and if a couple of stud sophomores are ready to have their names on the marquee.

2012 Schedule & Results

Record: 8-5 | Adj. Record: 11-2 | Final F/+ Rk: 23
Date Opponent Score W-L Adj. Score Adj. W-L
30-Aug Washington State 30-6 W 29.9 - 12.5 W
8-Sep Weber State 45-13 W 33.0 - 18.3 W
15-Sep at Utah 21-24 L 20.1 - 16.6 W
20-Sep at Boise State 6-7 L 18.4 - 9.5 W
28-Sep Hawaii 47-0 W 43.8 - 12.9 W
5-Oct Utah State 6-3 W 29.8 - 10.4 W
13-Oct Oregon State 24-42 L 26.9 - 35.1 L
20-Oct at Notre Dame 14-17 L 23.6 - 29.1 L
27-Oct at Georgia Tech 41-17 W 29.2 - 8.1 W
10-Nov Idaho 52-13 W 29.8 - 23.4 W
17-Nov at San Jose State 14-20 L 29.7 - 22.7 W
24-Nov at New Mexico State 50-14 W 28.8 - 18.1 W
20-Dec San Diego State 23-6 W 17.6 - 10.9 W
Category Offense Rk Defense Rk
Points Per Game 28.7 65 14.0 3
Adj. Points Per Game 27.7 70 17.5 5

2. Rallying behind Taysom Hill

BYU cycled through the quarterbacks in 2012. Riley Nelson, finally getting a chance to prove himself as a starter for an entire season, instead struggled with injuries. Taysom Hill, Nelson's anointed successor, directed BYU's best performance of the season (against Hawaii), then bowed out with a knee injury on a play that was supposed to be in victory formation. Nelson returned despite a back injury, then got knocked out with rib issues. James Lark finished the season.

Adj. Points Per Game with Riley Nelson at quarterback (9 games): BYU 26.7, Opponent 19.5 (plus-7.2)
Adj. Points Per Game with Taysom Hill at quarterback (2 games): BYU 36.8, Opponent 11.7 (plus-25.1)
Adj. Points Per Game with James Lark at quarterback (2 games): BYU 23.2, Opponent 14.5 (plus-8.7)

The injuries left BYU headless for a good portion of the year. The Cougars were far from bad on offense, but they were directionless and, at best, mediocre to decent. And it probably goes without saying that you are more likely to lose close games if you have no idea what to expect from the quarterback position.

We do, however, know that BYU's best game of the season came with Hill at quarterback. We also know that Hill is both healthy and the only one left from last year's QB battle. The backup is an untested walk-on, and former blue-chipper Tanner Mangum is going on a two-year mission. Hill is the man in Provo. Now he just needs to remain upright.

Taysom Hill. Russ Isabella-US PRESSWIRE.

Offense

Category Yards/
Game Rk
S&P+ Rk Success
Rt. Rk
PPP+ Rk
OVERALL 60 53 43 55
RUSHING 65 59 70 52
PASSING 50 49 32 62
Standard Downs 54 50 61
Passing Downs 44 32 52
Redzone 71 60 82
Q1 Rk 49 1st Down Rk 47
Q2 Rk 43 2nd Down Rk 101
Q3 Rk 106 3rd Down Rk 48
Q4 Rk 30

3. Wanted: an identity

BYU's offense was decent at most things and good at almost nothing in 2012. The Cougars were well above average in terms of converting passing downs (usually by way of an eight-yard gain on third-and-8), but they fell into too many passing downs to be consistently solid. Their running game was relatively explosive but prone to losses. Their passing game was perfectly efficient but less than explosive. And their identity changed based on who was behind center. With Taysom Hill, BYU averaged 50 rushes and 30 passes per game. With Lark, it was 33 rushes and 47 passes (despite holding a lead through most of each game). And with Nelson, it was 38 rushes and 42 passes.

Naturally, these changes happened because of the skill sets of the QBs at hand. But you get whiplash looking at the twists and turns in BYU's 2012 identity.

There is hope in this regard, however, and part of this hope comes in a complete lack of options. Hill is the guy, and his ability to run (and his inability to, as of yet, pass consistently or avoid sacks) pretty much ends the search for an identity. With Hill as signal caller, expect a run-heavy attack, which suits the personnel well. Hill was explosive, and Jamaal Williams, a freshman thrust into action with the transfer of Josh Quezada, at the very least held his own. With a limited passing game, BYU has no choice but to lean on its backfield. And it might pay off.

Quarterback

Note: players in bold below are 2013 returnees. Players in italics are questionable with injury/suspension.

Player Ht, Wt 2013
Year
Rivals Comp Att Yards Comp
Rate
TD INT Sacks Sack Rate Yards/
Att.
Riley Nelson 181 308 2,011 58.8% 13 13 21 6.4% 5.7
James Lark


73 116 778 62.9% 8 2 3 2.5% 6.3
Taysom Hill 6'2, 218 So. *** (5.6) 42 71 425 59.2% 4 2 6 7.8% 5.0
Ammon Olsen 6'3, 209 So. NR







Running Back

Player Pos. Ht, Wt 2013
Year
Rivals Rushes Yards Yards/
Carry
Hlt Yds/
Carry
TD Adj.
POE
Jamaal Williams RB 6'0, 190 So. *** (5.5) 166 775 4.7 4.4 12 +0.4
Riley Nelson QB 65 341 5.2 3.0 1 +2.9
Michael Alisa RB 6'1, 220 Sr. ** (5.4) 58 222 3.8 2.8 1 -3.9
Taysom Hill QB 6'2, 218 So. *** (5.6) 49 373 7.6 6.4 4 +13.3
David Foote RB 42 198 4.7 3.6 0 -1.0
Paul Lasike RB 6'0, 227 Jr. NR 33 129 3.9 1.5 2 -2.8
JD Falslev SLOT 5'8, 184 Sr. NR 18 109 6.1 11.5 0 +2.3
James Lark QB 14 44 3.1 1.8 1 -2.4
Iona Pritchard RB 6'0, 244 Jr. ** (5.1) 13 39 3.0 1.9 0 -2.1
Adam Hine RB 6'1, 202 So. *** (5.5)





Receiving Corps

Player Pos. Ht, Wt 2013
Year
Rivals Targets Catches Yards Catch Rate Yds/
Target
Target
Rate
%SD Real Yds/
Target
RYPR
Cody Hoffman WR 6'4, 215 Sr. ** (5.0) 145 100 1248 69.0% 8.6 31.7% 60.0% 8.6 160.8
JD Falslev SLOT 5'8, 184 Sr. NR 61 37 274 60.7% 4.5 13.3% 52.5% 4.6 35.3
Ross Apo WR 6'3, 207 Jr. **** (5.9) 55 31 311 56.4% 5.7 12.0% 65.5% 5.4 40.1
Kaneakua Friel TE 6'5, 250 Sr. ** (5.4) 51 30 308 58.8% 6.0 11.2% 76.5% 5.7 39.7
Jamaal Williams RB 6'0, 190 So. *** (5.5) 36 27 315 75.0% 8.8 7.9% 52.8% 8.9 40.6
Skyler Ridley WR 6'0, 182 Sr. NR 29 20 206 69.0% 7.1 6.3% 48.3% 7.0 26.5
David Foote RB 19 12 122 63.2% 6.4 4.2% 63.2% 6.5 15.7
Devin Mahina TE 6'6, 247 Jr. **** (5.8) 12 8 128 66.7% 10.7 2.6% 50.0% 9.6 16.5
Richard Wilson TE 6'3, 240 Sr. *** (5.7) 12 7 102 58.3% 8.5 2.6% 83.3% 10.6 13.1
Michael Alisa RB 6'1, 220 Sr. ** (5.4) 9 6 23 66.7% 2.6 2.0% 77.8% 1.8 3.0
Austin Holt TE 6'5, 250 Jr. *** (5.7) 4 2 22 50.0% 5.5 0.9% 25.0% 9.0 2.8
Mitch Mathews WR 6'6, 213 So. *** (5.5) 3 2 27 66.7% 9.0 0.7% 100.0% 5.4 3.5
Brett Thompson TE 6'3, 220 Jr. *** (5.6)







Eric Thornton SLOT 5'9, 170 So. NR








Talon Shumway WR 6'3, 190 Fr. *** (5.5)








4. Grading Cody Hoffman on a curve

Because Hill only really played about 2.5 games (he was used quite a bit against Boise State), BYU's full-season stats skewed toward the pass. That was a problem, as really only Cody Hoffman provided any value in the passing game.

The slot receiver averaged 7.4 yards per catch, which is fine as long as you've got about an 80 percent catch rate; Falslev's was only 60 percent. Former blue-chipper Ross Apo contributed very little. The tight ends were decent but didn't stand out. Williams and Skyler Ridley at least contributed decent catch rates, but it is a bit of a miracle that Hoffman was even able to average 8.6 yards per target considering the attention defenses were able to give to him.

The receiving corps has plenty of former three- and four-star recruits in it, and if players like Apo or tight end Devin Mahina (who did pretty well with his one target per game) were to suddenly play like they were supposed to coming out of high school, then Hill might begin to get the help he needs. But that's a pretty big if.

Offensive Line

Category Adj.
Line Yds
Std.
Downs
LY/carry
Pass.
Downs
LY/carry
Opp.
Rate
Power
Success
Rate
Stuff
Rate
Adj.
Sack Rate
Std.
Downs
Sack Rt.
Pass.
Downs
Sack Rt.
Team 104.1 2.85 3.26 40.8% 72.5% 19.4% 106.9 5.7% 6.0%
Rank 52 82 59 43 36 72 58 81 50
Player Pos. Ht, Wt 2013
Year
Rivals Career Starts/Honors/Notes
Braden Hansen C 49 career starts
Braden Brown RT 41 career starts
Ryker Mathews LT 6'6, 292 So. **** (5.8) 13 career starts
Houston Reynolds C 6'2, 305 Sr. ** (5.4) 11 career starts
Manaaki Vaitai C 6'3, 317 Sr. *** (5.6) 9 career starts
Solomone Kafu LG 6'2, 305 Jr. ** (4.9) 8 career starts
Blair Tushaus C 7 career starts
Brock Stringham RG 6'6, 290 Jr. *** (5.5) 3 career starts
Famika Anae LG 1 career start
Michael Yeck RT 6'8, 288 Jr. ** (5.4)
Tui Crichton LG 6'3, 343 So. *** (5.6)
Terrance Alletto C 6'3, 285 So. *** (5.7)
De'Ondre Wesley OL 6'6, 310 Jr. *** (5.5)
Edward Fusi OL 6'1, 285 Jr. ** (5.2)
Josh Carter OL 6'5, 290 Jr. ** (5.2)
Brayden Kearsley OL 6'5, 295 Fr. **** (5.8)
Brad Wilcox LT 6'7, 285 Fr. ** (5.3)

5. The line needed help

The BYU offensive line certainly wasn't bad in 2012 ... but it wasn't very good, either. The Cougars were right at about the middle of FBS in terms of run blocking and pass protection, converting pretty well on short-yardage situations but struggling with breakdowns, especially on standard downs. Opponents were able to make a lot of stops in the backfield against both the run and pass (particularly when Hill was at QB).

And Bronco Mendenhall clearly thought of the line as an issue, bringing in three junior college transfers, plus a four-star freshman in Brayden Kearsley, to plump up the depth chart. The reinforcements better be ready, because BYU now faces replacing a three-year starting tackle (Braden Brown) and a four-year starting center (Braden Hansen). BYU is bereft of experienced Bradens in 2013; perhaps a young Brayden, and maybe a De'Ondre, an Edward, a Tui, or a Terrance can keep BYU's line afloat.

Defense

Category Yards/
Game Rk
S&P+ Rk Success
Rt. Rk
PPP+ Rk
OVERALL 3 7 5 10
RUSHING 2 4 3 6
PASSING 10 14 12 16
Standard Downs 5 3 14
Passing Downs 13 20 10
Redzone 12 5 27
Q1 Rk 62 1st Down Rk 9
Q2 Rk 2 2nd Down Rk 19
Q3 Rk 9 3rd Down Rk 1
Q4 Rk 2

6. Damn, was this a good defense last year

I in no way grew up a BYU fan, but it was really, really frustrating watching BYU's offense falter in 2012 and waste some of the opportunities presented to it by a defense that was aggressive, fun, and remarkable. The talent in the front seven was unmatched by just about any school in the country not named Alabama, and while it took a little bit to find its rhythm (BYU saw some slow starts at times) and the passing downs defense could be a little bit leaky at times, if you enjoy attacking defenses, BYU's was for you.

The unit's depth has taken a hit heading into 2013, but the star power is still certainly there in the form of linebackers Kyle Van Noy and Spencer Hadley, corner Jordan Johnson, and perhaps a sophomore or two up front. I cannot guarantee the unit will be quite as effective this fall, but it should be just as aggressive and fun to watch.

Defensive Line

Category Adj.
Line Yds
Std.
Downs
LY/carry
Pass.
Downs
LY/carry
Opp.
Rate
Power
Success
Rate
Stuff
Rate
Adj.
Sack Rate
Std.
Downs
Sack Rt.
Pass.
Downs
Sack Rt.
Team 116.5 2.30 2.64 28.8% 59.3% 25.9% 132.1 6.9% 8.9%
Rank 12 2 18 2 16 5 21 13 25
Name Pos Ht, Wt 2013
Year
Rivals GP Tackles % of Team TFL Sacks Int PBU FF FR
Ezekiel Ansah DE 13 48.5 7.7% 13 4.5 1 9 1 0
Romney Fuga NT 13 29.0 4.6% 2.5 1.5 0 1 0 0
Bronson Kaufusi DE 6'7, 270 So. **** (5.9) 13 17.0 2.7% 5.5 4.5 0 1 0 1
Russell Tialavea DE 13 14.5 2.3% 2 1 0 2 0 2
Eathyn Manumaleuna NT 6'2, 288 Sr. ** (5.3) 4 8.0 1.3% 4 2 0 1 1 0
Remington Peck DE 6'4, 250 So. *** (5.5) 9 6.0 1.0% 1 1 0 0 0 0
Simote Vea NT 9 4.0 0.6% 0 0 0 0 0 1
Mike Muehlmann DE 2 0.5 0.1% 0 0 0 0 0 0
Austin Holt DE 6'5, 250 Jr. *** (5.7)

Marques Johnson NT 6'2, 321 Jr. *** (5.5)
Logan Taele DE 6'2, 240 So. NR
Michael Doman DE 6'4, 240 So. NR

Tuni Kanuch NT 6'1, 285 RSFr. **** (5.8)
JonRyheem Peoples NT 6'6, 298 Fr. *** (5.6)






7. Reloading up front

First, let's say this: there is hope. In losing Top 5 draft pick Ziggy Ansah, tackle Romney Fuga, and backup end Russell Tialavea, BYU finds itself in need of replacing three of the four primary members of last year's stellar line. Ansah made Kyle Van Noy's job pretty easy at times and occupied blockers like the perfect 3-4 end, while Fuga was a lovely space-eater.

But there is a load of potential in players like end Bronson Kaufusi, who could be ready for a major star turn, 2011 starter Eathyn Manumaleuna, who missed nine of 13 games last year (and put up similar numbers in 2011 to what Fuga posted last year), and newcomers to the rotation like end Austin Holt and redshirt freshman Tuni Kanuch. This unit is not very proven at this point, but the ceiling is high. And if it can simply remain competent, the linebackers could do the rest.

Linebackers

Name Pos Ht, Wt 2013
Year
Rivals GP Tackles % of Team TFL Sacks Int PBU FF FR
Brandon Ogletree BLB 13 76.0 12.1% 13.5 0 0 4 0 0
Kyle Van Noy WLB 6'3, 235 Sr. **** (5.8) 13 45.0 7.2% 22 13 2 5 6 1
Spencer Hadley SLB 6'1, 227 Sr. ** (5.2) 13 42.5 6.8% 9 3.5 0 1 1 2
Uona Kaveinga MLB 13 36.5 5.8% 4.5 0.5 1 2 0 1
Uani' Unga MLB 6'1, 233 Sr. NR 13 22.0 3.5% 3 1 1 1 1 0
Alani Fua SLB 6'5, 215 Jr. *** (5.7) 13 10.5 1.7% 0 0 1 0 0 0
Manoa Pikula BLB 6'1, 235 So. *** (5.6) 12 7.5 1.2% 1.5 0 0 0 0 0
Austen Jorgensen MLB 6'2, 239 Sr. ** (5.4) 4 1.5 0.2% 0 0 0 0 0 0
Tyler Beck BLB 6'1, 220 Sr. ** (5.3) 4 1.0 0.2% 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jherremya Leuta-Douyere WLB 6'0, 236 So. ** (5.3) 10 0.5 0.1% 0 0 0 0 0 0
Toloa'i Ho Ching MLB 6'0, 225 RSFr. *** (5.6)

Kalolo Manumaleuna Utu LB 6'2, 250 Jr. ** (5.4)







8. KVN4Heisman

His supporting cast will change, and that is a little bit scary, but Kyle Van Noy was either the best or second-best playmaking linebacker in the country. Only Georgia's Jarvis Jones could challenge him for that title. In Ansah, he had a fantastic setup man up front; and in Brandon Ogletree, he had the perfect tackling machine next to him at inside linebacker. Van Noy was free to take chances because these two guys could help to cover for him. Without them, his production could slip unless players like Kaufusi and new BLB Manoa Pikula step up. But he set the bar so high in 2012 that 18 tackles for loss, five passes defensed, and five forced fumbles would represent slippage.

Van Noy was just so fun to watch in 2012. He logged 4.5 tackles for loss against Utah alone, then threw in two sacks for a loss of 24 yards against Hawaii. After a relatively quiet October, he erupted late: three solo tackles for loss against San Jose State, three more against New Mexico State (all sacks), and 3.5 TFLs, a pick-six, and a blocked punt touchdown against San Diego State in one of the most dominant bowl performances you'll ever see.

BYU's success will depend as much on its offense and its defensive newcomers as it will on Van Noy. But in KVN, BYU has a player for which opponents absolutely must gameplan against and account for on every single play. That is an extreme luxury.

Secondary

Name Pos Ht, Wt 2013
Year
Rivals GP Tackles % of Team TFL Sacks Int PBU FF FR
Daniel Sorensen KAT 6'2, 215 Sr. *** (5.6) 13 54.5 8.7% 2 0 3 5 2 1
Preston Hadley CB 13 49.5 7.9% 3.5 1.5 1 7 1 0
Jordan Johnson CB 5'10, 185 Jr. ** (5.3) 12 41.5 6.6% 1.5 0 1 15 0 1
Craig Bills FS 6'2, 209 Jr. **** (5.8) 13 39.0 6.2% 0 0 0 5 1 0
Joe Sampson FS 9 27.0 4.3% 1 0 0 2 0 0
Matt Hadley S 7 6.0 1.0% 0.5 0 0 0 0 0
Mike Hague CB 5'10, 190 Sr. ** (5.4) 4 4.5 0.7% 0 0 0 1 0 0
Skye PoVey DB 5'11, 200 Sr. NR 3 1.5 0.2% 0 0 0 0 0 0
Micah Hannemann DB 8 1.0 0.2% 0 0 0 0 0 0
Adam Hogan CB 5'11, 180 Sr. NR
Blake Morgan FS 5'11, 184 Sr. NR
Michael Wadsworth KAT 6'1, 182 So. NR
Trent Trammell DB 5'11, 180 Jr. ** (5.4)
Samuel Lee DB 6'0, 180 Jr. ** (5.4)
Jacob Hannemann CB 6'1, 190 Fr. ** (5.2)
Dallin Leavitt DB 5'11, 202 Fr. *** (5.5)

Special Teams

Punter Ht, Wt 2013
Year
Punts Avg TB FC I20 FC/I20
Ratio
Riley Stephenson 59 45.4 5 10 30 67.8%
Kicker Ht, Wt 2013
Year
Kickoffs Avg TB TB%
Justin Sorensen 6'1, 232 Sr. 63 62.4 26 41.3%
Riley Stephenson 8 60.0 0 0.0%
Place-Kicker Ht, Wt 2013
Year
PAT FG
(0-39)
Pct FG
(40+)
Pct
Justin Sorensen 6'1, 232 Sr. 27-30 6-10 60.0% 0-2 0.0%
Riley Stephenson 16-19 4-6 66.7% 0-0 0.0%
Returner Pos. Ht, Wt 2013
Year
Returns Avg. TD
JD Falslev KR 5'8, 184 Sr. 11 26.0 0
Joe Sampson KR 8 21.0 0
Cody Hoffman KR 6'4, 215 Sr. 3 24.0 0
JD Falslev PR 5'8, 184 Sr. 26 9.5 0
Category Rk
Special Teams F/+ 71
Net Punting 2
Net Kickoffs 59
Touchback Pct 56
Field Goal Pct 113
Kick Returns Avg 19
Punt Returns Avg 65

9. Riley Stephenson was a weapon

As good as the BYU defense was, it was done some serious favors in the field position battle. Punter Riley Stephenson was just about as good as it gets, averaging over 45 yards per kick and rarely allowing for a good return opportunity. His isn't the biggest departure BYU must account for in 2013, but he's an important one, especially considering how iffy BYU's special teams play was outside of the punting game (and kick returns).

2013 Schedule & Projection Factors

2013 Schedule
Date Opponent Proj. Rk
31-Aug at Virginia 65
7-Sep Texas 11
21-Sep Utah 52
27-Sep Middle Tennessee 98
4-Oct at Utah State 46
12-Oct Georgia Tech 38
19-Oct at Houston 57
25-Oct Boise State 12
9-Nov at Wisconsin 14
16-Nov Idaho State NR
23-Nov at Notre Dame 8
30-Nov at Nevada 74
Five-Year F/+ Rk 30
Two-Year Recruiting Rk 70
TO Margin/Adj. TO Margin* -3 / +4.0
TO Luck/Game -2.7
Approx. Ret. Starters (Off. / Def.) 14 (8, 6)
Yds/Pt Margin** -5.1

10. Hello, spotlight

Since BYU's move out of the Mountain West and into independence, I've considered it an honorary BCS-level squad, right alongside Notre Dame. The Cougars have never had any major-conference affiliation, but they have a national title and a Heisman in the trophy case, and they have played at a reliably major level through most of the last four decades.

And with 2013's schedule, they are certainly acting like a major program. Holy moly. In a month's span late in the season, BYU visits both Wisconsin and Notre Dame and welcomes Boise State to town. They host Texas and Utah in September, make an early trip to Virginia, and, in all, play seven BCS conference teams, plus Utah State and Boise State, 2012's two best mid-majors. In all, only two opponents are projected worse than 75th, and seven are projected 52nd or better. That is a very impressive slate, better than that of a lot of BCS teams.

BYU could be ready for it, too. It's difficult to make an outright guarantee of that with an all-sophomore offensive backfield, new faces on the offensive line, and new players complementing Van Noy. But the Cougars still have Van Noy, Cody Hoffman, an active secondary, and a world of potential on the defensive line. And they might have an offensive identity to boot.

All bets are off if Taysom Hill gets hurt, but I see BYU as a legitimate Top 20-25 team heading into 2013. And if the Cougars are ready to actually close games this time around, they could escape from a tough schedule with a lot of tough wins. I like this team a lot.

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