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Baylor's reportedly firing school president Ken Starr. Will anyone else join him?

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"The Baylor board of regents is expected to remove six-year school president and chancellor Ken Starr by the end of the month," according to Chip Brown, a reporter at Scout's Texas Longhorns site.

Starr, football coach Art Briles and athletic director Ian McCaw have faced ongoing criticism for the school's sexual assault scandal, with the latter two named in a former student's lawsuit and credible voices pondering the possible end of Briles' tenure. Roughly a dozen former BU football players have been accused of violence against women over the last eight years, though this problem goes beyond football and even beyond Baylor itself.

The school president is better known as the 1990s independent counsel who investigated Bill Clinton's consensual (per Monica Lewinsky) activities. The irony of Starr's university having a sexual assault investigation scandal has been noted. (The school president now seemingly sympathizes with Clinton.) Starr's relative public silence throughout the nearly year-long story has frustrated plenty of people.

(It should also be mentioned that Brown's inaccurately reported on non-UT programs in the pastCBS' Waco affiliate reports it cannot independently verify a removal, but confirms Starr's job status has been a point of discussion.)

What effects could this have on the football program?

Brown's reporting has read as if it's written primarily for fans of a rival team, repeatedly implying that this is an overt football-above-everything decision, seeing as Briles currently remains. Brown refers to Starr, the leader of perhaps the university most embarrassed by Title IX issues, as "the fall guy." Andy Staples has a good explanation of why BU would be foolish to try to protect football at all costs.

Seeing Starr's exit as proof of Briles' long-term job security would also seem to assume this scandal won't include further revelations or future fallout. The regents have been briefed by a BU-commissioned law firm on an investigation into the scandal, but the full report has not been made public.

It also raises questions of whether evidence connects Briles to potential cover-ups, crucial warnings about certain players (he's been accused of failing to respond to five or six different accusations against one player), or failings in any specific episodes. Many argue Briles should lose his job regardless, of course. Starr reportedly is.

I think we should wait a bit longer before deciding whether Briles deserves to be fired (though I wouldn't argue it all that fiercely), and we should definitely wait before declaring Baylor's placed all of the final blame on one person.

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