clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

After collapsing with vertigo, Jason Day will try to play U.S. Open on Saturday

In contention at Chambers Bay, Jason Day stays in the U.S. Open field just a day after a scary collapse on the 9th hole.

Andrew Redington/Getty Images

Jason Day, just 24 hours removed from collapsing at the U.S. Open with vertigo, will give it a go in the third round at Chambers Bay. Day's reps filtered word out Saturday morning that he was not going to withdraw, and those close to him said he was feeling much better after a night of rest following the initial medical attention.

Day went down at the green of his final hole on Friday. Because of the terrain and the many slips and falls we've seen this week by fans, players and caddies, the initial thought was Day had just wiped out on the sidehill going down to the green. But he's dealt with vertigo for several years now, and he's had bout with it in recent weeks.

He had to back out of the Byron Nelson just before that tournament last month in Dallas and went through a full battery of tests. This week, however, he got back up and made one of the best bogeys you'll see, given his condition after staying down on the turf completely motionless at the 9th. A rowdy crowd at that grandstand went totally silent, and Jordan Spieth shooed away photographers trying to get a shot of Day down on the turf.

But Saturday's round seemed in doubt as Day was held and walked to the scoring trailer and treatment trailer as soon as his round ended. He went back down on one knee after finishing the hole, and then had trouble moving. He'll be back at Chambers Bay, however, teeing off at 1:55 p.m. local (4:55 ET).

Day, a premier talent in the game and always a threat at the majors, is actually in the hunt and one of just a handful of players under par. At 2-under, he's currently tied for 9th and in position to contend again at a major championship. A series of unfortunate injuries and health issues have impeded him at several majors, but here's hoping Saturday goes smooth for the Aussie.