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State Farm calls Lamarr Houston and Stephen Tulloch's 'Discount Double Check' injuries 'unfortunate'

It is stupid that players hurt themselves doing celebrations, and even stupider that an insurance company had to say something about it.

First, Stephen Tulloch tore his ACL doing an emphatic version of the Aaron Rodgers' celebration after sacking the Green Bay QB. Then, Lamarr Houston tore his ACL doing the same celebration, although not while sacking Rodgers. Obviously, State Farm has a comment on the rash of Discount Double Check-related injuries tearing up the NFC North:

"It's very unfortunate that these players injured themselves while celebrating, but it is our belief that the Discount Double Check is not inherently dangerous," said a State Farm spokeswoman. "In fact, it can be used to help you save money on insurance when performed correctly. We encourage all athletes to celebrate responsibly."

For clarity's sake, I want to point out that this spokeswoman is talking about two different things. One is the Discount Double Check, a service provided by State Farm to help you save money on insurance. The other is a celebration Aaron Rodgers has been doing since well before he was in a State Farm commercial. The spokeswoman is not claiming that doing a celebration can help you save money on insurance. That is not true. No hand motion can do this.

Rodgers' celebration used to just be called "the championship belt" celebration because he was pretending he had a wrestling championship belt. Now we exclusively call it "the Discount Double Check," because State Farm did a really incredible job pushing its advertisements with Aaron Rodgers. That advertising push apparently includes completely claiming Rodgers' celebration, even when he's doing it on field during games not during State Farm ads. It apparently extends to when overenthusiastic versions of this celebration cause players serious, painful injuries.

It is stupid that players hurt themselves doing celebrations, and even stupider that an insurance company had to say something about it.