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Alex Rodriguez injury: Brian Cashman tells A-Rod to 'shut up'

The Yankees general manager had a select choice of words for A-Rod, who is already using his Twitter account to cause trouble.

Elsa

New York Yankees general manager Brian Cashman was furious Tuesday when asked by reporters about a tweet from third baseman Alex Rodriguez that contradicted what Cashman had previously been telling the media, reports Andrew Marchand of ESPN New York.

"You know what, when the Yankees want to announce something, [we will]," Cashman told ESPN New York. "Alex should just shut the f--- up. That's it. I'm going to call Alex now."

Rodriguez tweeted that he had been cleared to play in rehab games, which didn't square with what Cashman had said a day earlier.

Cashman told ESPN's Wallace Matthews Monday that Rodriguez "has not been cleared by our doctors to play in rehab games yet." Cashman said Rodriguez is getting closer, but no date had been set.

This comes just a day after Rodriguez's Twitter account came to public attention. The confusion came from the fact that Rodriguez received this news from Dr. Bryan Kelly, who was in charge of the surgery and oversaw his recovery in New York. After Rodriguez left for Tampa, Kelly no longer had control of his care. Team doctors have yet to clear him to play in games, and Cashman said that until they do there will not be a timetable set.

This is yet another public relations mishap for the troubled superstar, who also faces a possible suspension from the league and worsening relations with the Yankees. Considering his enormous contract, Rodriguez and the Yankees will have to deal with each other for a while, and it is not looking positive at the moment.

Rodriguez, 36, hit .272 with 18 home runs during the 2012 season. He has yet to record an at-bat in 2013.

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